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May 2018

The 2018 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals: an all-new visual guide to data and development

World Bank Data Team's picture
Download PDF (30Mb) / View Online

“The World Bank is one of the world’s largest producers of development data and research. But our responsibility does not stop with making these global public goods available; we need to make them understandable to a general audience.

When both the public and policy makers share an evidence-based view of the world, real advances in social and economic development, such as achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), become possible.” - Shanta Devarajan

We’re pleased to release the 2018 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals. With over 180 maps and charts, the new publication shows the progress societies are making towards the 17 SDGs.

It’s filled with annotated data visualizations, which can be reproducibly built from source code and data. You can view the SDG Atlas online, download the PDF publication (30Mb), and access the data and source code behind the figures.

This Atlas would not be possible without the efforts of statisticians and data scientists working in national and international agencies around the world. It is produced in collaboration with the professionals across the World Bank’s data and research groups, and our sectoral global practices.
 

Trends and analysis for the 17 SDGs

Event: 50 Years of Measuring World Economies – Wednesday May 23, 2018 at 4pm EST

Nada Hamadeh's picture
Join us live online or in-person on Wednesday at 4pm for "50 Years of Measuring World Economies" event held at the World Bank James D. Wolfensohn Atrium in Washington, DC.
 
The International Comparison Program (ICP) – the world’s largest global data initiative led by the World Bank under the auspices of the United Nations Statistical Commission – is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Since the initiation of the ICP as a modest research project at the University of Pennsylvania by Irving Kravis, Alan Heston and Robert Summers in 1968, the Program has grown to cover about 200 countries and 20 global, regional and sub-regional agencies.
 

To commemorate this milestone, World Bank Group Chief Executive Officer Kristalina Georgieva, 2015 Nobel Laureate in economics Sir Angus Deaton, and Georgetown University Provost Robert M. Groves will come together at an event to discuss the challenges and opportunities for investing in evidence for sustainable development. In addition, Lawrence H. Summers, the 71st Secretary of the US Treasury and son of ICP co-founder Robert Summers, will share a recorded tribute. A video produced by the World Bank for the occasion will showcase the history and impact of the ICP.

Survey specialists and data scientists meet: machine learning to measure a person’s height from a picture.

Michael M. Lokshin's picture
A test subject holding a reference image and a silhouette derived from the photo by Tensorflow/DeepLab semantic image segmentation model.

Human body measurements are used to evaluate health trends in various populations. We wanted a simple way to reliably measure someone’s height as part a field interview, using a photo of them holding a reference object. We’ve developed an approach and would highlight two things we learned during the process:

  • With an iteratively refined method, it’s possible to get a measure of someone’s height accurate to 1% from a well-composed image of them holding a calibrated paper printout. We plan to integrate this functionality in to the free World Bank Survey Solutions CAPI tool.

  • We found working with an in-house team of survey specialists and data scientists the best way to tackle this problem. It’s only when we combined our domain knowledge and field experience with our data science skills and a healthy dose of creative problem solving, were we able to develop a working prototype.