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Africa

Meet four women leading the drive for open data in Africa

David Mariano's picture

Editor’s note: This is a guest blog from Jeni Tennison, CEO at the Open Data Institute. This article was first published by This is Africa on 17th January 2017​.

 
Nkechi Okwuone

Across Africa, innovators are using open data to gain greater insight into local issues, and create new public services. From government open data platforms to startup accelerator programmes, open data is increasingly recognised as a tool for tackling challenges across a range of sectors including health, education and agriculture.

This autumn, in six cities across South Africa the Responsive Cities Challenge encouraged designers and entrepreneurs to use open data to develop solutions that will improve local government services. Meanwhile, in Burkina Faso, the CartEau project is using open data to map safe drinking water points and latrines across the country for the first time. These examples show how open data is a powerful vehicle for addressing complex problems.

Increasing digital connectivity is important for economic growth, education and democratic participation but the equalising force of the Web is only meaningful when everyone is included in the digital sphere. According to the Web Foundation, women face disproportionate barriers to access, with poor women in urban areas in 10 developing countries they looked at 50% less likely to be connected to the Internet than men in the same age group.

Open data – data anyone can access, use or share – is transformative infrastructure for a digital economy that is consistently innovating and bringing the benefits of the Web to society. Open data often goes hand in hand with open working cultures and open business practices. While this culture lends itself to diversity, it is important that those who are involved in open data make sure it addresses everyone's needs. It is therefore encouraging to see that open data initiatives in African countries are being led by women.

Chart: Public Transport in African Cities Often Unaffordable

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文

The typical household in many African cities cannot afford public transport fares. According to a new report, public transport in Sub-Saharan Africa's major cities is dominated by informal minibuses, and is expensive relative to household budgets making it largely unaffordable on a daily basis, especially for the poorest.

Read more in the new report "Africa’s Cities - Opening Doors to the World"

Education as a development priority at the global, regional, and country levels

Svetlana Markova's picture
“Education” is at the top of the world’s development agenda, the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and the focus of the upcoming 2018 World Development Report of the World Bank.  The World Bank monitors views of development experts around the globe and finds consistently that “education” is perceived as key to development at different levels.
 
In the past five years, the World Bank’s Country Opinion Survey Program surveyed more than 25 thousand opinion leaders in the field of development in nearly all client countries across the globe. In some countries the surveys were conducted two or even three times during 2012-2016.
 
"What is the most important development priority for your country?"[1] was one of the questions to representatives of national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in developing countries.
 
At the global level, -- where 57 million children in the world still remain out of school[2], -- “education” has emerged amongst survey respondents as one of the top two development priorities across the regions.

Percentage and number of opinion leaders seeing “education” as a top development priority by region (123 developing countries, 2012-2016).​

 

Nigeria General Household Survey 2015-2016: Data and documentation now available

Vini Vaid's picture
© Curt Carnemark / World Bank

The National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) in collaboration with the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) team launched the third wave (2015–16) of the Nigeria General Household Survey (GHS)-Panel in Abuja, on December 13, 2016.  
 
The GHS-Panel survey is a nationally representative survey administered every 2–3 years, that covers a range of topics including demography, education, welfare, agriculture, health and food security. The data is collected in two visits: post-planting and post-harvest seasons. The survey follows the same households over time and collects a rich set of information, to allow for comprehensive time-series analyses that can help shape policies for a wide array of development sectors. Here are some interesting findings from the 2015–16 survey:

Chart: How Does Extreme Poverty Vary By Region?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文


Most of the world's extreme poor live in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. While over 1 in 10 people live in extreme poverty globally, in Sub-Saharan Africa, that figure is 4 in 10, representing 389 million people - that's more poor people than all other regions combined. Read more in the new report on Poverty and Shared Prosperity
 

On the road to sustainable growth: measuring access for rural populations

Edie Purdie's picture
Also available in: العربية | 中文


This is part of a series of blogs focused on the Sustainable Development Goals and data from the 2016 Edition of World Development Indicators.  This blog draws on data from the World Bank’s Rural Access Index and on results presented in the report Measuring Rural Access: using new technologies

In Nepal, 54 percent of the rural population lives within 2 kilometers of an all season road.

Nepal, Rural Access Index: 2015

Just over half of the rural population in Nepal lives within 2 kilometers of a road in good or fair condition as measured by the Rural Access Index (RAI) in 2015, leaving around 10.3 million rural residents without easy access. The map shows how the RAI varies across the country: in the southern lowlands, where both road and population density are high, the RAI is around 80 percent in some districts. In the more rugged northern regions, lower road density and poor road quality leave many disconnected, resulting in a low RAI figure – in many places less than 20 percent.

Chart: Poverty is Driving Informal Work Among Foreign Service Providers to Democratic Republic of Congo

Erin Scronce's picture

A new report, From Hair Stylists and Teachers to Accountants and Doctors - The Unexplored Potential of Trade in Services in Africa, indicates that African countries are trading in services, often in unexpected ways. Africa’s export potential in traditional services, such as tourism, is clearly recognized, but the emerging success of exports of nontraditional services is often overlooked. Hairdressers, doctors, educators, and accountants are all examples of service providers who are moving across borders to take advantage of employment opportunities away from home. Many of these workers are finding opportunity in the informal sector, driven to other countries due to poverty and lack of opportunities at home. Read more in the feature story and report

Boosting demand for open aid data: lessons from Kenya’s e-ProMIS

Daniel Nogueira-Budny's picture

One journalist used it as a data source for a story on solar energy in Makueni County. Another accessed the data for inclusion in a piece on sanitary napkin distribution in East Pokot. Development partners reported relying on the data to coordinate specific activities in the Central Highlands of Kenya. And this is to say nothing of the government users of the data managed by the Electronic Project Monitoring Information System for the Government of Kenya (e-ProMIS), Kenya’s automated information management system on development projects funded by both domestic and foreign resources.
 

 

Global Data Lab: a resource for subnational development indicators from household surveys

Jeroen Smits's picture

This is a guest blog written by Jeroen Smits of the Global Data Lab, an initiative hosted by the Nijmegen Center for Economics (NiCE) at Radboud University in the Netherlands.  

Disaggregation of indicators at the subnational level is one of the key elements to effectively monitor the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). At the same time, this is a great challenge, as in the case for many countries, only indicators at the national level are available.
 
This is particularly the case for poor countries, where administrative systems are less equipped and capable to generate reliable and representative information. Strengthening those systems is the preferred solution, but that takes time and does not produce the indicators for earlier years required for tracing developments over time.

Kenyan firms benefit from increased use of financial services and lower crime-related losses

Silvia Muzi's picture

The private sector continues to be a critical driver of job creation and economic growth. However, several factors can undermine the private sector and, if left unaddressed, may impede development.  Through rigorous face-to-face interviews with managers and owners of firms, the World Bank Group’s Enterprise Surveys benchmark the business environment based on actual experiences of firms.

This blog focuses on surveys conducted of 781 Kenyan firms across five regions (including Nairobi and Mombasa) and six business sectors—i) food, ii) textiles and garments, iii) chemicals, plastics and rubber, iv) other manufacturing, v) retail, and vi) other services.

Under Kenya’s new constitution, the country recently embarked on several major business reforms that promoted a more market-friendly environment. Some examples of positive benefits include boosts in public investment in infrastructure, increased interest from foreign investors, and lowered transaction costs from information technology improvements. The Kenya Enterprise Surveys sheds light on how the country’s private sector fared amidst these reforms.

More firms use financial services than before

According to the Kenya Enterprise Surveys (ES) data, the use of financial services has improved since 2007.  On average, 44% and 41% of Kenyan firms use banks to finance investment and working capital, respectively. The corresponding figures in 2007 were much lower at 23% and 26%. Moreover, the percentage of Kenyan firms with a bank loan is 36%, which is on par with the global average yet higher than the average of countries in the same income group (do note that when this survey was conducted, Kenya was classified as a low income country, having since graduated to a lower middle income country).

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