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The World Region

Chart: Half of the World's Extremely Poor are Children

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Half the world's extremely poor are children. New analysis from the World Bank and UNICEF finds that almost 385 million children were living in extreme poverty in 2013. 9 out of 10 of those children lived in just 20 countries. Read more in "Ending Extreme Poverty: A Focus on Children

Chart: Fewer People Live in Extreme Poverty Than Ever Before

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | 中文 | العربية

In 2013, an estimated 767 million people were living under the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day. Even as the world's population has grown, the number of poor has gradually fallen. But in spite of this progress, with over 1 in 10 people considered poor, poverty remains unacceptably high. Read more in the new report on Poverty and Shared Prosperity

Facebook, the OECD & the World Bank have a new way to survey businesses

Tim Herzog's picture


Countries in which firms were surveyed for initial round of “Future of Business Survey”

Facebook, the OECD and World Bank have just released the “Future of Business Survey” - a new source of information on small and medium enterprises. You can download the report and explore the results here.

The shared goal of this work is to help policymakers, researchers, and businesses to better understand business sentiment, and to leverage a digital platform to provide a unique source of information.

Chart: The World's Top Tourist Destinations

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Français

More than a billion tourists travel every year. Tourism is a powerful tool for reducing poverty, boosting economic growth, building social progress and ensuring peace. In the past 20 years, the world's top tourist destinations have remained popular, but the share of tourism-related income going to low and middle income countries has been rising. Read more about international tourism data in this earlier blog.

Maximize analytical use of Public Sector Debt Statistics: D1-D4 matrix approach

Rubena Sukaj's picture
Also available in: العربية | 中文

The Financial Data Team of the Development Economics Data Group (DECDG) is pleased to announce the launch of our Online Quarterly Bulletin’s second edition, an e-newsletter spotlighting debt statistics news, trends, and events. The current issue features the following:

  • Organizing Public Sector Debt (QPSD) statistics to maximize their analytical use and international comparability
  • Bond Issuance by low- and middle-income countries in 2015
  • External debt trends for high-income countries in 20105
  • Debt statistics-related event summaries


One highlight in this edition is the introduction of the D1-D4 matrix, a cascading approach used to present the QPSD data. The primary aim of the QPSD initiative is to institute a standardized measure for each dimension of public sector debt. The QPSD database displays country data for the same set of debt instruments such as 1. debt securities, 2. loans, 3. currency and deposits, 4. Special Drawing Rights, 5. Other accounts payable, and 6. insurance, pensions, and standardized guarantee schemes for the following institutional sectors of the economy: 1) general government, (2) central government, (3) budgetary central government, (4) non-financial public corporations (5) financial public corporations, and (6) the total consolidated public sector debt.

Charts: Where do Refugees Originate From and Where are they Hosted?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Español

"Forcibly Displaced" - a new report out today, offers a new perspective on the global crisis and how humanitarian and development actors can work together to support the individuals affected. The report draws on sources including the UNHCR's Global Trends 2015 which shows that 9 in 10 of the world's refugees originate from 20 countries, and 9 in 10 are hosted by about 40 countries.

On the road to sustainable growth: measuring access for rural populations

Edie Purdie's picture
Also available in: العربية | 中文


This is part of a series of blogs focused on the Sustainable Development Goals and data from the 2016 Edition of World Development Indicators.  This blog draws on data from the World Bank’s Rural Access Index and on results presented in the report Measuring Rural Access: using new technologies

In Nepal, 54 percent of the rural population lives within 2 kilometers of an all season road.

Nepal, Rural Access Index: 2015

Just over half of the rural population in Nepal lives within 2 kilometers of a road in good or fair condition as measured by the Rural Access Index (RAI) in 2015, leaving around 10.3 million rural residents without easy access. The map shows how the RAI varies across the country: in the southern lowlands, where both road and population density are high, the RAI is around 80 percent in some districts. In the more rugged northern regions, lower road density and poor road quality leave many disconnected, resulting in a low RAI figure – in many places less than 20 percent.

Chart: Literacy Rates Higher Among Youth than Adults

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | 中文

In 1970, four in 10 adults were illiterate. Today that figure is less than two in 10. In every region of the world, literacy has improved, and literacy rates among youth aged 15-24 are higher than adults over 15, especially in South Asia, Sub Saharan Africa and the Middle East. Access data on youth literacy and adult literacy at data.worldbank.org. 
 

Chart: Girls Closing The Education Gap in IDA Countries

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文

Since 1990, primary school completion rates in countries supported by the International Development Association (IDA) have risen by over 50%. The gap between girls and boys completion remains, but it’s fallen by 70% since 1990 and is now smaller than ever.
 

Going from more to better jobs

Siv Tokle's picture
Also available in: 中文

This is part of a series of blogs focused on the Sustainable Development Goals and data from the 2016 Edition of World Development Indicators.


Sustainable Development Goal 8 makes a specific commitment to improve the quality of employment. Its targets go beyond economic growth and more employment; they now commit us to job creation that is sustainable, more productive and inclusive. This is particularly applicable to women: the data show that women are disproportionately employed in lower productivity sectors.

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