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New Data Shows Meaningful Progress in Reducing Maternal Mortality

Emi Suzuki's picture

In the developing world, one way to reduce maternal mortality is to train professional midwives for both health facility and home deliveries. But what does the bigger picture of maternal mortality look like today?

The global maternal mortality ratio has fallen by 45% between 1990 and 2013, according to new estimates released today. This means that the world went from 380 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 210 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2013. While this decline represents substantial progress, the actual rate of decline is insufficient to reach Millennium Development Goal 5 (MDG 5) – a three-quarter reduction in 1990 levels by 2015. To truly reach the target, an annual average reduction of 5.5% would be needed between 1990 and 2015.

 

Global maternal mortality ratio, 1990 and 2013

Which country has the highest proportion of women in parliament?

Leila Rafei's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | 中文 | Français

The latest data from the Inter-Parliamentary Union show that Rwanda tops the list as the country with the highest proportion of women in parliament, with nearly 64 percent of seats held by women in 2013. Globally, women account for an average of about 20 percent of parliamentary seats, up from 15 percent a decade ago.

The top ten countries are a mix of high and middle income economies, some with legally mandated gender quotas and some without. Rwanda, a low income country, is followed by Andorra at a flat 50 percent and Cuba at 49 percent. Sweden, with 44 percent of parliamentary seats held by women, is the country that achieved the highest rate without any gender quota.

Proportion of seats held by women in national parliaments (%)

Sub-national Malnutrition Data

Vanessa Moreira da Silva's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | 中文 | العربية

There is a growing perception that spatial disparities in development indicators within countries are becoming more pronounced. Sub-national data are needed to inform policy makers on such matters. However, data on the sub-national level is less frequent (curated in a global setting) because sub-national administrative areas change frequently.

The Global State of AIDS in 4 Charts

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Español | Français | العربية

Yesterday was World Aids Day - an annual event to raise awareness about HIV and the global fight against it. When it comes to international data about HIV and AIDS, the cross-organisational UNAIDS program publishes age and gender disaggregated data on indicators such as prevalence, new infections and deaths. In turn, we incorporate some of these data into the World Development Indicators

Here are some highlights from the data that have been released:

1) There are more adults and children living with HIV than ever before

In 2012, there were an estimated 35.3 million adults and children living with HIV in the world. The majority of these people are in Sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. As you can see from the decreasing slope of the “global” line - while people continue to become infected, the rate of new infections is going down.

What does "life expectancy at birth" really mean?

Emi Suzuki's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Français | Español



If a child is born today in a country where the life expectancy is 75, they can expect to live until they are 75… right?

Not exactly. 

The statistic “Life expectancy at birth” actually refers to the average number of years a newborn is expected to live if mortality patterns at the time of its birth remain constant in the future. In other words, it’s looking at the number of people of different ages dying that year, and provides a snapshot of these overall “mortality characteristics” that year for the population.

Energy, Emissions and Elevation: 6 Quick Climate Facts

Tim Herzog's picture
Today, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a major report that raises the panel’s certainty that human activity, particularly the burning of fossil fuels, is the cause of much of the warming seen in recent years. The World Bank recently updated its data on estimate carbon dioxide emissions along with many other climate relevant indicators in the World Development Indicators. Here are some interesting takeaways from the data:
 

The World's CO2 emissions grew 4.9% in 2010


That's the 3rd largest annual increase since 1990 (early estimates of 2011 and 2012 emissions show further global increases since 2010, but not quite as large). Nationally, China, the United States, India, Russia and Japan continue to be the top 5 emitters. It's also notable that in 2010 South Korea surpassed Canada in 8th place, and South Africa fell out of the top 10 with an emissions drop of almost 3 percent.

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