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Open Data for economic growth: the latest evidence

Andrew Stott's picture

One of the key policy drivers for Open Data has been to drive economic growth and business innovation. There's a growing amount of evidence and analysis not only for the total potential economic benefit but also for some of the ways in which this is coming about. This evidence is summarised and reviewed in a new World Bank paper published today.

There's a range of studies that suggest that the potential prize from Open Data could be enormous - including an estimate of $3-5 trillion a year globally from McKinsey Global Institute and an estimate of $13 trillion cumulative over the next 5 years in the G20 countries.  There are supporting studies of the value of Open Data to certain sectors in certain countries - for instance $20 billion a year to Agriculture in the US - and of the value of key datasets such as geospatial data.  All these support the conclusion that the economic potential is at least significant - although with a range from "significant" to "extremely significant"!

New Metadata Query Feature in DataBank

Paige Morency-Notario's picture

DataBank is a data retrieval, analysis, and visualization tool that allows users to create, save, and share custom charts, tables, and maps. We launched the tool two years ago and have been making improvements based on user feedback ever since. Last year we released a multilingual version of the tool, and today we're pleased to announce a new feature that allows users to query country, series, time, and footnote metadata.

What can DataBank do?

  • It enables users to easily create custom queries on data drawn from 52 databases
  • It lets users create and customize charts, tables, and maps
  • It makes it easy to select, save and share data and visualizations
  • It's available on both computers and mobile devices
  • DataBank and selected data are available in English, Spanish, French, Arabic, and Chinese
  • It now allows users to create custom metadata queries
  • Watch the tutorial and read the FAQs to learn more about the basics of DataBank 

Between 1960 and 2012, the world average fertility rate halved to 2.5 births per woman

Emi Suzuki's picture

There were more than 7 billion people on earth in 2013. While this is the highest number ever, the population growth rate has been steadily declining, in part due to declining fertility rates.  Tomorrow, Friday, July 11, is World Population Day, and in this spirit, I'd like to talk about a key component of population growth: fertility rates.
 

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Wbopendata Stata Module Upgrade

Joao Pedro Azevedo's picture

The wbopendata Stata module has been updated to Version 13. The module can now be installed or updated directly from Stata's Statistical Software Components (SSC) repository.

To install or update your current wbopendata Stata module, please type the below text in the Stata command line:

ssc install wbopendata, replace
 

New features in this release:
  • Updated list of indicators with more than 2,000 new indicators, making a total of 9,900 indicators available
  • A revised list of country and regional codes
  • Five newly added topics: climate change, external debt, gender, Millennium Development Goals, and trade
  • A fully redesigned help file
  • A revised error reporting structure to facilitate the identification of connection failures, in particular, timeout errors

Here's an example of a query error caused by an invalid indicator:

Ten things you may not know about Brazil

Paige Morency-Notario's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | 中文 | العربية

Millions of soccer fans around the world have their eyes glued to Brazil for the FIFA World Cup games. In light of this, let's take a look at the World Bank's Open Data sets to get a closer look at Brazil, the world's fifth most populous country, and its neighbors.
 

Brazil: At-a-Glance
  • Population: 199 million
  • Surface area: 8.5 million sq. km
  • Terrestrial protected areas: 26.3% of total land
  • World's fourth largest cereal/dry grain producer
Source: World Development Indicators 2014
(dates of the data may vary)
 

LICs, LMICs, UMICs, and HICs: classifying economies for analytical purposes

Neil Fantom's picture
Also available in: 中文

Two previous posts outlined plans to review the World Bank's analytical income classification, here and here. Since we are updating this classification with new data soon (July 1, 2014), we wanted to let users know where this work stands.

Every year, the analytical classification groups all economies into four categories: low income countries (LICs); lower middle income countries (LMICs); upper middle income countries (UMICs); and high income countries (or HICs). This year we will update the classification using 2013 data, but we will not make any change to the methodology.

Data show rise in domestic credit in developing countries

Buyant Erdene Khaltarkhuu's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Español | Français

Access to finance, availability of credit, and cost of service are all key to financial development.  Credit finances production, consumption, and capital formation, which in turn lead to economic activity. The availability of credit to households, private companies, and public entities shows the worldwide growth of the banking and financial sector.

In this Q&A blog post, we examine domestic credit data trends as compiled in the World Development Indicators 2014, and what the data reveal about the changing financial landscape in developing countries.  

Q: What is "domestic credit provided by the financial sector"?
A: Domestic credit provided by the financial sector is credit that is extended to various sectors. The financial sector includes monetary authorities such as the central bank (the entity which controls the supply of a country's currency), deposit money banks (commercial "main street" banks), and other financial institutions.  In a few countries, governments may hold international reserves as deposits in the financial system rather than in the central bank.  Since claims on the central government are a net item (claims on the central government minus central government deposits), the figure may be negative, resulting in a negative figure for domestic credit provided by the financial sector. 

Sub-National Malnutrition Indicators Map

Sub-National Malnutrition Indicators map showcases subnational estimates of child malnutrition (prevalence for stunting, underweight, overweight, wasting and severe wasting indicators) using the most recently available data for each country mapped. The five indicators are calculated based on the WHO Global Database on Child Growth and Malnutrition which is a carefully maintained database covering over eight hundred first level administrative divisions for 86 developing countries.

International tourism data: top destinations, number of arrivals, and more

Wendy Ven-dee Huang's picture
Also available in: 中文

When you hear the words “top tourist destination,” do sandy beaches and national parks come to mind? Perhaps places with historical significance like the Egyptian pyramids or the temples of Angkor Wat in Cambodia?  When we take a close look at the tourism data, we see that some of the top tourist destinations in the world are in low- and middle-income countries, specifically, in the East Asia and Pacific region.

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