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What's the Most Popular World Bank Open Data?

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Many of you ask what the most popular resources on the open data sites are. I can usually offer a rough answer, but I thought I'd take a moment to respond to the question properly. There's more analysis below, but here's the summary of most popular pages and downloads from the data site:

 Most Popular Pages
1The Indicator, Country and Topic pages
2GDP, GNI and GINI (Inequality) related pages
3The Data Catalog & World Development Indicators page
4Individual country pages: China, USA, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia
5Topic pages: including education, health and poverty
6Economic statistics: goods exports, foreign investment and inflation
7Country income classifications and methodology
8Population, population growth and life expectancy

 

 Most Popular Data Downloads
1GDP and GNI Related Data
2World Development Indicators XLS/CSV/PDF
3Country Data: China, USA, India, Brazil, Indonesia
4Foreign Direct Investment & Exports Data
5Population Data
6Inflation Data
7African Development Indicators
8Country Income Classifications Data

 

Is this what you were expecting? Does it correspond with how you use the site?

This week: Open Access, Big Data and Development Policy

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Are you interested in the accessibility of research, the application of data and the future of development policy? Don't miss these three events happening at the World Bank this week:

 

  1. Monday 22nd at 4pm EST: The Kickoff of Open Access Week 2012
  2. Thursday 25th at 2pm EST: "Turning Big Data into Big Impact"
  3. Thursday 25th- Friday 26th: "Using History to Inform Development Policy"

 

Life in the post-transparency age

Prasanna Lal Das's picture

life-in-the-post-transparency-agIn the World Bank Finances team, we're currently asking ourselves what's next after publishing open financial data? What comes after transparency?

There's of course a lot we still need to do -- we need to help other people publish data (other people's data can make ours even more powerful and help tell more complete stories), we need to help people learn to use our data, we need to raise awareness about the availability and potential of open data, there of course is more (and more granular) data we still need to publish, and the like.

 

Seeing Between the Lines: Visualizing Global Poverty Trends

Johan Mistiaen's picture

Last month, while World Bank President Jim Yong Kim launched the gender data portal, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton remarked that “data not only measures progress, it inspires it”.  Indeed when data is both relevant and effectively communicated, it can help to inform policies, identify challenges, and catalyze changes and innovations that deliver development results.

With that goal in mind, we started an Open Data Lab.  One of our objectives is to help the development community become more effective data communicators by experimenting with different data visualization techniques and tools.  The human brain finds it easier to process data and information if it is presented as an image rather than raw numbers or words.  And visualizations that let and encourage users to interact with data can deepen their understanding of the information presented. 

Your Top 5 questions about World Bank Open Data

Maryna Taran's picture

This page in Spanish | French | Arabic | Chinese

When the World Bank opened its doors and launched the Open Data Initiative two years ago, our Data Help Desk was flooded with questions, requests and comments from students, researchers, journalists, economists, statisticians and more. The demand for our data has only grown, and right now, our team answers around a thousand data-related queries a month by email and phone.

blog
Meet the World Bank Open Data Helpdesk Team

 

Data and Feedback for Development

Tariq Khokhar's picture

This post is authored by World Bank Managing Director Caroline Anstey and originally appeared on the Voices blog - please leave any comments there.

Even a cursory glance at the Internet would tell you there is a lot going on in the Bank on Open Development. Add in cutting edge approaches using SMS messaging by Think Tanks, CSOs and Foundations and you quickly see that mapping for results, crowd-sourcing, beneficiary feedback, and Open Data hold out enormous promise of leveraging technology for more effective development - as the technology grows and cheapens, we've all only begun to scratch the surface of its full potential.   

The Power of Open: Crowd-Sourced Ideas & Crowd-Powered Solutions

Samuel Lee's picture

#DDC2012 + #RHoK - The people spoke, financial data was published, and answers were developed.

What did you do this weekend? How was your weekend? For most of us, these are simple routine questions which often warrant rote and unrehearsed responses: “fine,” “great,” and perhaps even a nonchalant, “not bad.” However, those who took part in the World Bank Finances Development Data Challenge (DDC) on Friday and Random Hacks of Kindness (RHoK) on Saturday & Sunday were not only witness to but a part of an extraordinary series of events that displayed the power of crowd-sourced ideas and solutions. They might tell the story of an amazing three days, a story of collective passion, resolve, collaboration, and results. It is the story of how an idea was formed, empowered, and developed over what was collectively just over twenty-four hours.

The Top 5 Ways to Access World Bank Data

Tariq Khokhar's picture

So. You're looking for the World Bank's data. Here are the top 5 ways I access it, what are yours?

1) data.worldbank.org

Our most popular open data destination - the main World Bank Data site gives you an overview of the data we have on a country, region or topic. I like it because you can quickly browse and filter through many years of indicator data, make some basic charts and even embed them into your own web page. 

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