Syndicate content

Open Data for economic growth: the latest evidence

Andrew Stott's picture

One of the key policy drivers for Open Data has been to drive economic growth and business innovation. There's a growing amount of evidence and analysis not only for the total potential economic benefit but also for some of the ways in which this is coming about. This evidence is summarised and reviewed in a new World Bank paper published today.

There's a range of studies that suggest that the potential prize from Open Data could be enormous - including an estimate of $3-5 trillion a year globally from McKinsey Global Institute and an estimate of $13 trillion cumulative over the next 5 years in the G20 countries.  There are supporting studies of the value of Open Data to certain sectors in certain countries - for instance $20 billion a year to Agriculture in the US - and of the value of key datasets such as geospatial data.  All these support the conclusion that the economic potential is at least significant - although with a range from "significant" to "extremely significant"!

New Metadata Query Feature in DataBank

Paige Morency-Notario's picture

DataBank is a data retrieval, analysis, and visualization tool that allows users to create, save, and share custom charts, tables, and maps. We launched the tool two years ago and have been making improvements based on user feedback ever since. Last year we released a multilingual version of the tool, and today we're pleased to announce a new feature that allows users to query country, series, time, and footnote metadata.

What can DataBank do?

  • It enables users to easily create custom queries on data drawn from 52 databases
  • It lets users create and customize charts, tables, and maps
  • It makes it easy to select, save and share data and visualizations
  • It's available on both computers and mobile devices
  • DataBank and selected data are available in English, Spanish, French, Arabic, and Chinese
  • It now allows users to create custom metadata queries
  • Watch the tutorial and read the FAQs to learn more about the basics of DataBank 

Full set of International Comparison Program 2011 results now available

Nada Hamadeh's picture

The big splash from the April 2014 summary release provided users with a glimpse of the International Comparison Program's (ICP) 2011 results and findings, as revealed in Haishan Fu's blog post and related press release.  Users can now explore the full set of the 2011 ICP results released in June 2014.

These results provide data on purchasing power parities (PPPs) of currencies, expenditure shares of gross domestic product (GDP), total and per capita expenditures in United States dollars (USD) both in exchange rate terms and PPP terms, and price level indices. This dataset covers 26 expenditures categories for goods and services for 199 participating economies from Africa, Asia and the Pacific, the Caribbean, the Commonwealth of Independent States, Latin America, Eurostat-OECD, Western Asia, singleton economies, and the Pacific Islands. Also included are estimated results for non-participating economies.

Figure 1 below presents a multidimensional comparison of per capita GDP - scaled to the relative size of each economy - against its price level index (PLI) with the world equal to 100. The PLI, the ratio of a PPP to a corresponding exchange rate, is used to compare price levels between economies.

Between 1960 and 2012, the world average fertility rate halved to 2.5 births per woman

Emi Suzuki's picture

There were more than 7 billion people on earth in 2013. While this is the highest number ever, the population growth rate has been steadily declining, in part due to declining fertility rates.  Tomorrow, Friday, July 11, is World Population Day, and in this spirit, I'd like to talk about a key component of population growth: fertility rates.
 

Figure 1

 

Figure 2

Wbopendata Stata Module Upgrade

Joao Pedro Azevedo's picture

The wbopendata Stata module has been updated to Version 13. The module can now be installed or updated directly from Stata's Statistical Software Components (SSC) repository.

To install or update your current wbopendata Stata module, please type the below text in the Stata command line:

ssc install wbopendata, replace
 

New features in this release:
  • Updated list of indicators with more than 2,000 new indicators, making a total of 9,900 indicators available
  • A revised list of country and regional codes
  • Five newly added topics: climate change, external debt, gender, Millennium Development Goals, and trade
  • A fully redesigned help file
  • A revised error reporting structure to facilitate the identification of connection failures, in particular, timeout errors

Here's an example of a query error caused by an invalid indicator:

Ten things you may not know about Brazil

Paige Morency-Notario's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | 中文 | العربية

Millions of soccer fans around the world have their eyes glued to Brazil for the FIFA World Cup games. In light of this, let's take a look at the World Bank's Open Data sets to get a closer look at Brazil, the world's fifth most populous country, and its neighbors.
 

Brazil: At-a-Glance
  • Population: 199 million
  • Surface area: 8.5 million sq. km
  • Terrestrial protected areas: 26.3% of total land
  • World's fourth largest cereal/dry grain producer
Source: World Development Indicators 2014
(dates of the data may vary)
 

Lives on the line: reducing under-five child mortality rates in Africa

Dereje Ketema Wolde's picture
As countries all across Africa recognize International Day of the African Child today, I thought it would be a timely opportunity to blog about the progress of under-five child mortality rates over the past two decades.  But first, some data for us to understand the big picture:
  • On a global level, the rate of under-five child mortality has been cut in half, from 90 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 48 per 1,000 in 2012.  The estimated annual number of under-five deaths has fallen from 12.6 million to 6.6 million over the same period.
  • Since 1990, 216 million children worldwide have died before their fifth birthday — more than the current total population of Brazil, the world's fifth most populous country.
  • Disparities between children in the high-income and low-income countries have narrowed, but many gaps still remain.  Case in point: In Luxembourg, the under-five mortality rate is just 2 deaths per 1,000 live births; in Sierra Leone, it is 182 deaths per 1,000 births.

As we stand a year away from the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 – which aims to reduce the global under-five child mortality rate by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015 – the pace of reduction would have needed to quadruple in 2013-2015 to achieve this goal, according to the United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF's) Committed to Child Survival: A Promised Renewed – Progress Report 2013.

A closer look at regional rates
Now let's take a look at the regional and country level data by viewing the World Development Indicators (WDI) 2014 and the indicator under-five mortality rate. The WDI also features a short progress report on MDG 4, which complements the detailed analysis of the World Bank Group's Global Monitoring Report.  This report uses the same methodology to assess whether countries are on track or off track to meet the 2015 targets.

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where one in ten children die before the age of five, faces the biggest challenges in achieving MDG 4, followed by South Asia.  The SSA region reduced its child mortality rate by 45% during 1990 to 2012, the only region to reduce its under-five mortality rate by less than half during this time.  SSA also lags behind other regions in its pace of decline in the total number of under-five deaths.

Figure 1

Pages