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Intersecting sources of education inequality

Elizabeth King's picture

Developing countries today have unprecedented numbers of schools, classrooms, teachers—and students.  Remarkable accomplishments have also been made towards achieving gender equality at all levels of education (see World Bank, 2010). Since 1999, girls’ gross enrollment rates have risen fastest in South Asia, especially at the primary level, by about 30 percentage points; in South Asia, girls’ enrollment rates at the secondary level rose almost as fast. In the other regions where girls’ enrollment rate at the primary level was already very high, girls’ enrollment rate at the secondary and tertiary levels showed impressive increases. 

Open Data community hacks D.C. and global issues

Samuel Lee's picture

Marking the second annual International Open Data Day, Washington D.C. was one of more than 100 cities worldwide on February 23 to host a hackathon. Data enthusiasts gathered at the World Bank to show support for and encourage the adoption of transparent policies by the world's local, regional, and national governments.

 

Would you give up your personal data for development?

Prasanna Lal Das's picture

 

 

If you joined us at the World Bank for Open Data Day on Saturday, February 23, you heard about the DC Data Dive slated for March 15-17. 

 

If you're playing catch up, read more about the plans and potential impact for future Data Dives. Also have a look at what colleagues at a Data Dive in Venice accomplished by analysing World Bank contracts and vendors. And now, read the cross-posted blog below from UNDP's Giulio Quaggiotto and World Bank's Prasanna Lal Das who ask: Would You Give Up Your Personal Data for Development? 

 

International debt flows before and after the financial crisis

Evis Rucaj's picture

New debt statistics show that the composition of long term debt inflows in 2011 follows pre-crisis patterns.

Debt statistics are central to understanding the impact of the financial crisis; the World Bank's International Debt Statistics provides a detailed picture of debt flows of 128 developing countries. Now that the 2013 edition has been released, and as a member of the team that put it together, I thought I would look back at what the data tell us actually happened to international debt flows to developing countries before and after the recent financial crisis.

New Stata module released

Joao Pedro Azevedo's picture

A new Stata module wbopendata has been released. The module can be installed or updated directly from within Stata using Statistical Software Components (SSC) repository.

The new features of this release include:

  • Updated list of indicator, with over 1,000 new indicators, adding up to 7,349 series;
  • Ability to download multiple series of indicators;
  • Information such as series frequency, variable name, and label are now stored, and returned as macros.

 

Being average is your superpower

Sandra Moscoso's picture

Last week, on my way home from work, I met a young man raising funds for a charity. He stood outside of a subway station and as part of his pitch, he asked, "if you could have any superpower, what would it be?" I offered the same answer I have been giving my children for years. "I have a superpower. It's reading." I suspect this both annoys and inspires my children. Given that annoying and inspiring are among my favorite parental duties, I rather like this answer.

What does data tell us about debt of high income and developing countries?

Rasiel Vellos's picture

Since the global financial crisis of 2008, analysis and discussion of debt has taken center stage in economic and fiscal policy, especially in high income countries. Working closely with the IMF and other partners, the World Bank maintains two quarterly databases that provide useful information on external and public sector debt of many countries.

International Debt Statistics: Open Data on a wider scale

Ibrahim Levent's picture

For over three decades debt statistics published by the World Bank have provided the authoritative accounting of the external debt of developing countries. Governments, investors and bankers, academics, and journalists have relied on them to identify financial trends and vulnerabilities.

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