Syndicate content

How can the open government data toolkit help you?

Iulian Pogor's picture

We’ve recently released an Open Government Data Toolkit (OGD Toolkit), designed to provide staff at the World Bank and in country governments a basic set of resources for initiating and developing an open data program. The toolkit is a “work in progress” which we expect to revise and improve as we receive your feedback and real-world experience.

 

We developed the toolkit based on questions we’ve frequently heard from countries considering open data programs:

Seven things I learned about data visualization

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Last week, the World Bank Data team descended on New York City for Visualized - a two day event exploring the “evolution of communication at the intersection of big data, storytelling and design.”

It was awesome.

Here are seven things I learned:

1) Iteration is the path to perfection

By now you’ve heard of Nate Silver - the statistician behind FiveThirtyEight and a near-perfect prediction of the 2012 US elections. What you may have missed is the best interactive graphic of the year - the New York Times’ “Paths to the White House” built with Mike Bostock’s D3:

 Shan Carter from the NYT graphics team showed how newspapers have struggled to represent the potential scenarios and actual outcomes of US elections ever since the late 19th century. His team eventually came up with the graphic above, but see how many revisions they went through to get there:

That’s 257 revisions. As early as version 15, you can see the core idea. At version 81, it looks almost done, but it takes another 157 revisions and that extra attention to detail, high production values and pride in your work to be at the top of your game like this.

Lesson: Iterate and aim high: editors are your friends, they’ll make your work stand out. Also: this is the benchmark for what a good data visualization looks like - if you can’t honestly say what you’re doing is at least this good, iterate.

A Review of the analytical income classification

Shaida Badiee's picture

This post originally appeared on Let's Talk Development.

The World Bank’s classification of economies as low-, lower-middle-, upper-middle-, or high-income has a long history. Over the years these groupings have provided a useful way of summarizing trends across a wide array of development indicators. Although the income classification is sometimes confused with the World Bank’s operational guidelines, which set lending terms and are determined only in part by average income, the classification is provided purely for analytical convenience and has no official status.

New data resources on poverty, gender, jobs, health and more: a quick guide

Maryna Taran's picture

You’ll find a large amount of data available through the World Bank’s Open Data Initiative: for time-series alone, there are some 8,000 indicators for around 200 countries. And we’re often asked: “what indicators do you have on topic X, and which should I use?” One way to find your way around is to start at our topical pages. Or, if you have some familiarity with our databases already, look at our full repository of time series data.

What's the Most Popular World Bank Open Data?

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Many of you ask what the most popular resources on the open data sites are. I can usually offer a rough answer, but I thought I'd take a moment to respond to the question properly. There's more analysis below, but here's the summary of most popular pages and downloads from the data site:

 Most Popular Pages
1The Indicator, Country and Topic pages
2GDP, GNI and GINI (Inequality) related pages
3The Data Catalog & World Development Indicators page
4Individual country pages: China, USA, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia
5Topic pages: including education, health and poverty
6Economic statistics: goods exports, foreign investment and inflation
7Country income classifications and methodology
8Population, population growth and life expectancy

 

 Most Popular Data Downloads
1GDP and GNI Related Data
2World Development Indicators XLS/CSV/PDF
3Country Data: China, USA, India, Brazil, Indonesia
4Foreign Direct Investment & Exports Data
5Population Data
6Inflation Data
7African Development Indicators
8Country Income Classifications Data

 

Is this what you were expecting? Does it correspond with how you use the site?

This week: Open Access, Big Data and Development Policy

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Are you interested in the accessibility of research, the application of data and the future of development policy? Don't miss these three events happening at the World Bank this week:

 

  1. Monday 22nd at 4pm EST: The Kickoff of Open Access Week 2012
  2. Thursday 25th at 2pm EST: "Turning Big Data into Big Impact"
  3. Thursday 25th- Friday 26th: "Using History to Inform Development Policy"

 

Mobile Apps for Health, Jobs and Poverty Data

Leila Rafei's picture

If open data is the key to unlocking knowledge and information, then our free, new mobile apps knock down the door.

Family of data, family of apps

The DataFinder apps for iOS and Android use an intuitive interface to present the Bank’s open data for you to explore, analyze and share directly from your smartphone or tablet. The first DataFinder app featured a general selection of data from the World Development Indicators, and today we have new apps focusing on Jobs, Health and Poverty Data. With these apps, you don’t need to be a statistician to navigate charts and maps of development data. 

Child mortality: new data and faster progress

Emi Suzuki's picture
Levels & Trends 
in Child Mortality: 
Report 2012

Substantial progress has been made towards achieving MDG Goal on Reducing Child Mortality but still insufficient – The new UN-World Bank child mortality estimates

New child mortality estimates (childmortality.org) show that substantial progress has been made towards achieving the fourth Millennium Development Goal. The estimates were released today by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation, which includes UNICEF, WHO, the World Bank and United Nations Population Division.

Since 1990 the global under-five mortality rate has dropped 41 percent, from 87 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 51 in 2011. Four of the six World Bank’s developing regions have reduced their under-five mortality rate by more than 50 percent: East Asia and Pacific, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa regions.  Progress towards Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 2015 target of a two-thirds reduction is also on track in these four regions. ("On track" indicates that under-five mortality is less than 40 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011 or that the annual rate of reduction is at least 4 percent over 1990-2011.)

Pages