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Between 1960 and 2012, the world average fertility rate halved to 2.5 births per woman

Emi Suzuki's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español

There were more than 7 billion people on earth in 2013. While this is the highest number ever, the population growth rate has been steadily declining, in part due to declining fertility rates.  Tomorrow, Friday, July 11, is World Population Day, and in this spirit, I'd like to talk about a key component of population growth: fertility rates.
 

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Wbopendata Stata Module Upgrade

Joao Pedro Azevedo's picture

The wbopendata Stata module has been updated to Version 13. The module can now be installed or updated directly from Stata's Statistical Software Components (SSC) repository.

To install or update your current wbopendata Stata module, please type the below text in the Stata command line:

ssc install wbopendata, replace
 

New features in this release:
  • Updated list of indicators with more than 2,000 new indicators, making a total of 9,900 indicators available
  • A revised list of country and regional codes
  • Five newly added topics: climate change, external debt, gender, Millennium Development Goals, and trade
  • A fully redesigned help file
  • A revised error reporting structure to facilitate the identification of connection failures, in particular, timeout errors

Here's an example of a query error caused by an invalid indicator:

Ten things you may not know about Brazil

Paige Morency-Notario's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | 中文 | العربية

Millions of soccer fans around the world have their eyes glued to Brazil for the FIFA World Cup games. In light of this, let's take a look at the World Bank's Open Data sets to get a closer look at Brazil, the world's fifth most populous country, and its neighbors.
 

Brazil: At-a-Glance
  • Population: 199 million
  • Surface area: 8.5 million sq. km
  • Terrestrial protected areas: 26.3% of total land
  • World's fourth largest cereal/dry grain producer
Source: World Development Indicators 2014
(dates of the data may vary)
 

Lives on the line: reducing under-five child mortality rates in Africa

Dereje Ketema Wolde's picture
As countries all across Africa recognize International Day of the African Child today, I thought it would be a timely opportunity to blog about the progress of under-five child mortality rates over the past two decades.  But first, some data for us to understand the big picture:
  • On a global level, the rate of under-five child mortality has been cut in half, from 90 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 48 per 1,000 in 2012.  The estimated annual number of under-five deaths has fallen from 12.6 million to 6.6 million over the same period.
  • Since 1990, 216 million children worldwide have died before their fifth birthday — more than the current total population of Brazil, the world's fifth most populous country.
  • Disparities between children in the high-income and low-income countries have narrowed, but many gaps still remain.  Case in point: In Luxembourg, the under-five mortality rate is just 2 deaths per 1,000 live births; in Sierra Leone, it is 182 deaths per 1,000 births.

As we stand a year away from the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 4 – which aims to reduce the global under-five child mortality rate by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015 – the pace of reduction would have needed to quadruple in 2013-2015 to achieve this goal, according to the United Nations Children's Fund's (UNICEF's) Committed to Child Survival: A Promised Renewed – Progress Report 2013.

A closer look at regional rates
Now let's take a look at the regional and country level data by viewing the World Development Indicators (WDI) 2014 and the indicator under-five mortality rate. The WDI also features a short progress report on MDG 4, which complements the detailed analysis of the World Bank Group's Global Monitoring Report.  This report uses the same methodology to assess whether countries are on track or off track to meet the 2015 targets.

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where one in ten children die before the age of five, faces the biggest challenges in achieving MDG 4, followed by South Asia.  The SSA region reduced its child mortality rate by 45% during 1990 to 2012, the only region to reduce its under-five mortality rate by less than half during this time.  SSA also lags behind other regions in its pace of decline in the total number of under-five deaths.

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LICs, LMICs, UMICs, and HICs: classifying economies for analytical purposes

Neil Fantom's picture
Also available in: 中文

Two previous posts outlined plans to review the World Bank's analytical income classification, here and here. Since we are updating this classification with new data soon (July 1, 2014), we wanted to let users know where this work stands.

Every year, the analytical classification groups all economies into four categories: low income countries (LICs); lower middle income countries (LMICs); upper middle income countries (UMICs); and high income countries (or HICs). This year we will update the classification using 2013 data, but we will not make any change to the methodology.

Data show rise in domestic credit in developing countries

Buyant Erdene Khaltarkhuu's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Español | Français

Access to finance, availability of credit, and cost of service are all key to financial development.  Credit finances production, consumption, and capital formation, which in turn lead to economic activity. The availability of credit to households, private companies, and public entities shows the worldwide growth of the banking and financial sector.

In this Q&A blog post, we examine domestic credit data trends as compiled in the World Development Indicators 2014, and what the data reveal about the changing financial landscape in developing countries.  

Q: What is "domestic credit provided by the financial sector"?
A: Domestic credit provided by the financial sector is credit that is extended to various sectors. The financial sector includes monetary authorities such as the central bank (the entity which controls the supply of a country's currency), deposit money banks (commercial "main street" banks), and other financial institutions.  In a few countries, governments may hold international reserves as deposits in the financial system rather than in the central bank.  Since claims on the central government are a net item (claims on the central government minus central government deposits), the figure may be negative, resulting in a negative figure for domestic credit provided by the financial sector. 

Sub-National Malnutrition Indicators Map

Sub-National Malnutrition Indicators map showcases subnational estimates of child malnutrition (prevalence for stunting, underweight, overweight, wasting and severe wasting indicators) using the most recently available data for each country mapped. The five indicators are calculated based on the WHO Global Database on Child Growth and Malnutrition which is a carefully maintained database covering over eight hundred first level administrative divisions for 86 developing countries.

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