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Chart: 2.4 Billion People Live Without Access to Toilets

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Français

The UN estimates that 2.4 billion people still lack access to improved sanitation facilities, nearly 1 billion of which practice open defecation. Good sanitation is a foundation for development - conditions such as diarrhea are associated with poor sanitation, and left untreated, can lead to malnutrition and stunting in children. Read more about World Toilet Day

Chart: 13% of Global Emissions Covered by a Carbon Price

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | 中文

Note: Only ETS (Emissions Trading Systems) or carbon tax are considered on this graph. Emissions are given as a share of global GHG emissions in 2012. Annual changes in global, regional, national, and subnational GHG emissions are not shown in the graph.

In the last 10 years, there's been a threefold increase in the share of greenhouse gas emissions covered by a carbon price. In 2016, about 40 national jurisdictions and more than 20 cities, states, and regions, including seven out of the world’s 10 largest economies, are putting a price on carbon. Seven Gigatons of carbon dioxide or about 13 percent of global emissions are covered by a carbon price. Read more in State and Trends of Carbon Pricing 2016.

5 reasons why big data innovation is critical to address climate resilience

Haishan Fu's picture


In today’s world of mobile technology, social networks, pervasive satellite and sensor information and machine-to-machine transactions, data is becoming the lifeblood of many economies. Data-informed decision making is more important than ever before. However, the ability to use data in development and decision-making processes has not seen the same progress. Relying on data to inform decisions requires that the appropriate tools and analytical methodologies exist in order to use it effectively.

Through the Big Data Innovation Challenge, the World Bank is calling out to innovators globally for higher resolution, regional or sector-specific big data prototypes and solutions in support of watersheds, forests, food security and nutrition.

Here are five facts from our climate team about our water, forests and food security that remind us why your big data innovation is necessary.

Chart: Tourism Reaches all-time high in Peru

Erin Scronce's picture

Peru welcomed 3.2 million tourists in 20 14, the highest number to date. In some regions of the country, like Cusco, tourism is a potential economic lifeline for local people, who can profit from a variety of businesses serving tourists. In 2012, the World Bank Group began working with The Government of Peru to streamline the processes around opening tourism-related businesses because excessive regulations and red tape were holding up investments in new businesses for years. Ultimately, the project shaved 3 years off the business registration process and eliminated 150 unnecessary regulations. With the streamlined regulations in place, investments in hotels in Peru are on the rise. Between 2015 and 2018, Peru is expecting US$1.2 billion in investments in new hotels, an increase from US$550 million during the period 2010-2014.

 Find out more here.

Chart: 25 Years of Growth in The World's Largest Cities

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | 中文

By 2030, two thirds of the world will live in cities. The world's 12 largest city areas are each home to over 15 million people, and over the last 25 years, cities such as Delhi, Shanghai and Beijing have tripled in size.

Open about what we do and open about what we’ve done

Stefan Koeberle's picture
Selected World Bank Projects in Ethiopia


Do you know that the World Bank makes openly available the details of projects, financials, and now results?

Six years ago we launched our open data initiative, and we remain committed to being open about what we know and open about what we do. Readers are probably familiar with our development data and statistics, but there’s a wealth of data available on our project and operations that’s also available in the IATI open data format.

Chart: 137 Economies Implemented 283 Business Reforms Last Year

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Doing Business 2017 finds that 137 economies worldwide implemented 283 business regulatory reforms last year. This represents an increase of more than 20% over the previous year. Areas of reform include starting a business, paying taxes, getting credit and registering property. Notably, 54 IDA countries implemented 113 reforms.

Seeing the forests and the trees

Gwendolyn Stansbury's picture

Forests and trees are sources of energy, food, shelter, and medicine—and, as such, contribute in multiple ways to reducing food insecurity, supporting sustainable livelihoods, and alleviating poverty.

But measuring forests’ socioeconomic benefits has been difficult due to methodological limitations and the lack of reliable data. As a consequence, the contribution of forests to sustainable development is not only underestimated, but is in some cases invisible, preventing policy makers from considering forest production and consumption benefits when developing social-welfare policies.

A new multi-partner publication provides a landmark contribution to data collection on the socioeconomic benefits of forests. Countries can use the modules and guidance in the book to help close the information gap on the multiple relationships between household welfare and forests. This, in turn, will help capture the true value of forests and other environmental products in gross domestic product measurements and increase understanding of their roles in livelihoods, ultimately leading to evidence-based policy decisions that ensure appropriate recognition of the socioeconomic benefits of forests in post-2015 development programs.

The publication is the result of collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), International Forestry Resources and Institutions (IFRI) Network, and the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) team and Program on Forests (PROFOR).

Link to the webcast publication launch: http://www.fao.org/webcast/home/en/item/4227/icode/

For practical guidance on household survey design, visit the LSMS Guidebooks page: http://go.worldbank.org/0ZOAP159L0 
 

Data needs to be local, equitable and collaborative

Haishan Fu's picture
Opening Session at IODC 2016

Earlier this month, over 1,500 people gathered in Madrid for the International Open Data Conference 2016. The World Bank is proud to be a co-organizer of this series of conferences which brings together the global community to shape the future of open data. I was asked to share our thinking on what’s on the horizon for open data and I’ve highlighted a few key ideas below.

Before I carry on though - a quick personal note. Being in Madrid reminded me of my first trip to the city 18 years ago, a few days before I took a new job as the chief of statistics at the UNDP's Human Development Report. Little did I know, while enjoying tapas before flying to New York, that a big part of my job was to become good friends with other international organizations, including the World Bank, so we could get, for free, in Excel sheets, the data they compile and disseminate, often through publication sales.

How things have changed since then with the Open Data Initiative! Now open data accounts for almost two thirds of all web traffic to the Bank and is freely available for anybody to access and use. I’d like to acknowledge my predecessor, Shaida Badiee, for having led the team to make open data happen at the World Bank six years ago, and for continuing to be a force for open data as head of Open Data Watch.

Chart: Where is Gender Discrimination in Business Regulated?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | 中文 | Français

60% of economies do not have laws mandating gender nondiscrimination in hiring and equal remuneration. Such laws are more common in OECD high-income economies, followed by economies in Europe and Central Asia. Gender equality can make institutions more representative, improve social cohesion and increase productivity.

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