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Data Lab Link Roundup: python pivot tables, Hypothesis for testing, data mining algorithms in plain english and more...

Tariq Khokhar's picture


The effect of time of day on mood via the Jawbone Blog

Here are some things that caught our attention last week:

  • There’s a consultation draft of the International Open Data Charter up for… consultation. It outlines a set of principles for accessing and using open data which are:

    • Open Data by Default;
    • Quality and Quantity;
    • Accessible and Useable by All;
    • Engagement and Empowerment of Citizens;
    • Collaboration for Development and Innovation;
  • My friend David MacIver is many things, but for readers of this post, he’s the author of Hypothesis. It’s a Python library that makes unit testing simpler and substantially more powerful by automating test case generation, using the concept of “property based testing” as Matt Bachmann outlines in his useful post.


Data Lab Link Roundup: June 29th, 2015

Tariq Khokhar's picture

A visual explanation of the Monty Hall Problem

I’m going to start writing more about the activities, experiments and research that we’ve been doing as part of our “Data Lab” here in the World Bank Data team and across the rest of the institution.

But first, something I enjoy on other blogs (e.g. David McKenzie over at “Development Impact”) is a “link roundup” of interesting content authors came across in the past week. So in this tradition, here are some things that caught our attention last week: 

  • News outlet Quartz launched Atlas - an aggregator for the charts and data visualizations that appear on their site. It takes advantage of their open source “Chartbuilder” tool that several other sites have taken and customized for their house styles.

It is time to measure development finance wholly and universally

Gail Hurley's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية | Español

At the start of 2016, the United Nations will launch a new set of Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, to drive development efforts around the globe. But one question still needs some thought: How will we finance these new goals?

Even more questions lie within this broader question on finance. Which countries need more resources? What types of resources are needed most? Where does international finance, both public and private, currently flow? Where does it not? Answers to all of these require reliable and easy-to-understand data on all international financial flows.

When governments convene in July in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia to agree on a framework for financing the new sustainable development agenda, there will be a key window of opportunity to improve the existing, haphazard approach to data collection and reporting.

MDG3: Large differences in gender equality between and within countries

Masako Hiraga's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية | 中文

This is the third in a series of posts on data related the Millennium Development Goals based on the 2015 Edition of World Development Indicators.

Millennium Development Goal 3  is to "Promote gender equality and empower women" and is measured against a target to "Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education, preferably by 2005, and in all levels of education no later than 2015" and also includes indicators to measure the proportion of seats held by women in national parliament and the share of women in wage employment in the non-agricultural sector.

Since 1990, the number of women in parliament has quadrupled in the Middle East and North Africa

Chart 1

More women are participating in public life and decision making at the highest levels than in 1990, based on the proportion of parliamentary seats held by women. Latin America and the Caribbean leads developing country regions in 2014, at 29 percent, followed closely by Sub-Saharan Africa at 22 percent. The biggest change has occurred in the Middle East and North Africa, where the proportion of seats held by women more than quadrupled between 1990 and 2014 . At the country level Rwanda leads the way with 64 percent in 2014, higher than the percentage for high- income countries, at 26 percent.

MDG2: Accelerating progress towards universal primary education

Hiroko Maeda's picture
Also available in: Español | العربية | Français

This is the second in a series of posts on data related the Millennium Development Goals based on the 2015 Edition of World Development Indicators.

Millennium Development Goal 2 is to "Achieve universal primary education" and is measured against a target to “ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling”

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 10.52.48 AM.png

After modest movement toward universal primary education in the poorest countries during the 1990s, progress has accelerated considerably since 2000. Achieving the MDG 2 target appeared within reach only a few years ago, but the primary school completion rate has been stalled at 91 percent for developing countries since 2009.

Only two regions, East Asia and Pacific and Europe and Central Asia, have reached or are close to reaching universal primary education. The Middle East and North Africa has steadily improved, to 95 percent in 2012, the same rate as Latin America and the Caribbean. South Asia reached 91 percent in 2009, but progress since has been slow. The real challenge remains in Sub-Saharan Africa, which lags behind with a 70 percent primary completion rate as of 2012.

Embarking on a new type of data: electronic and electrical equipment waste

Kees Baldé's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | Français

We can all relate to how electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) takes up more and more room in our homes and offices. And as the lifespan of EEE such as computers, smartphones, routers, and monitors shortens, this leads to unsightly piles of barely used, broken, or obsolete equipment.

Eventually these once pricey and “in-demand” EEE get handed over to electronic waste (e-waste) haulers.

The United Nations University (UNU) calculates that about 46 million tons of e-waste was generated globally in 2014, according to a recent study. Although these devices are an essential part of our daily modern life, the societal impact of e-waste can be severe if the e-waste is not managed according to proper waste management standards.

​For example, if the e-waste is treated without the necessary care, the e-waste handlers – and in the developing world, this would be working women and children – are exposed to toxic substances.

MDG 1: Uneven progress in reducing extreme poverty, hunger and malnutrition

Juan Feng's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | العربية

This is the first in a series of posts on data related the Millennium Development Goals based on the 2015 Edition of World Development Indicators.

Millennium Development Goal 1 is to "Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger" and is assosciated with three targets to: a) Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is less than one dollar a day; b) Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all; and to c) Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger. 

The latest estimates show that the proportion of people living on less than $1.25 a day fell from 43.6 percent in 1990 to 17.0 percent in 2011. Forecasts based on country-specific growth rates in the past 10 years indicate that the extreme poverty rate will fall to 13.4 percent by 2015, a drop of more than two-thirds from the 1990 baseline.

The number of people worldwide living on less than $1.25 a day is also forecast to be halved by 2015 from its 1990 level. Between 1990 and 2011 the number of extremely poor people fell from 1.9 billion to 1 billion, and according to forecasts, another 175 million people will be lifted out of extreme poverty by 2015.

This means that based on current trends, nearly half of developing countries have already achieved the Millennium Development Goal 1 (MDG1) target of halving the proportion of the population in extreme poverty five years ahead of the 2015 deadline.

Much of the world is deprived of poverty data. Let’s fix this.

Umar Serajuddin's picture
Cross posted from the Let's Talk Development Blog
Data Deprivation

The availability of poverty data has increased over the last 20 years but large gaps remain

About half the countries we studied in our recent paper, Data Deprivation, Another Deprivation to End are deprived of adequate data on poverty. This is a huge problem because the poor, who often lack political representation and agency, will remain invisible unless objective and properly sampled surveys reveal where they are, and how they’re faring. The lack of data on human and social development should be seen as a form of deprivation, and along with poverty, data deprivation should be eradicated.

Global Findex 2014: a bonanza of data on financial inclusion

Leora Klapper's picture
Also available in: 中文
Fellow data geeks, today is your lucky day!
​Today we launch our report The Global Findex Database 2014: Measuring Financial Inclusion around the World and The 2014 Global Findex database, an updated edition of what is by far the world’s most comprehensive gauge of global progress on financial inclusion. You may also find the database on the Development Data Group's Data Catalog

Want to learn how many adults own a bank account worldwide? Right this way. What happens with the gender gap when you break it down by country and region? We’ve got the stats … Check.  Where is mobile money making the biggest inroads, and what are the impacts? Check ... Check. How do adults save and borrow money, as well as manage financial risk? Check … Check … Check!

New 2015 edition of World Development Indicators shows 25 years of progress, but much left to do

Neil Fantom's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Français | Español

We’re pleased to announce that the 2015 edition of World Development Indicators (WDI)  has been released.  WDI is the most widely used dataset in our Open Data Catalog and it  provides high-quality cross-country comparable statistics about development and people’s lives around the globe. As usual you can download or query the database, read the publication and  access the online tables.

While the seasoned WDI user will know that the database is updated quarterly and historical versions are also available, for those new to the WDI, the annual release of a new edition is an opportunity to review the trends we’re seeing in global development and to take stock of what’s been achieved.