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Where do women most lag men in access to financial institutions?

Masako Hiraga's picture

Where do women most lag men in access to financial institutions?

 


Globally, an average of 65% of men and 58% of women over the age of 15 have an account at a financial institution. However, beneath this 7 percentage point global difference, there are many countries where the gender gaps are much wider. Find our more in the Gender Data Portal and the Global Findex data portal.

 

Why are Indigenous Peoples more likely to be poor?

Oscar Calvo-González's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese

Indigenous Peoples face poverty rates that are on average twice as high as for the rest of Latin Americans. This fact is probably not a surprise to most readers of this blog. More intriguing, however, are three additional findings from recent work on the topic.

First, until recently, we did not have as robust quantitative evidence of such poverty gaps as that found in the recent World Bank report Indigenous Latin America in the Twenty-First Century. In fact, not all countries in the region have data on poverty by ethnicity and fewer still have the micro-data needed to understand the stumbling blocks that Indigenous Peoples face on the path out of poverty.

Second, the gap between the poverty rate of Indigenous Peoples and the rest of the population is not getting smaller. In some countries the gap remains stagnant and in others it is actually widening. Why are Indigenous Peoples benefiting less from growth and more likely to be poor? One way to explore these issues is to disentangle how much of the poverty gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations can be explained by factors such as that indigenous peoples tend to live in rural areas, have lower education, etc. The results of such analysis bring us to my final point, illustrated in the chart below.

Source: SEDLAC (World Bank and CEDLAS). Note: the bars represent the percentage of people living on less than US$4 per day 2005 PPP for indigenous peoples and the rest of the population. The poverty rates are calculated using late-2000s weighted average for Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Peru.
*Variables include characteristics of the head of the household (education, age, and gender), family composition (number of non-working members), geographical characteristics (country of residence, rural status) and employment characteristics of the head (sector of employment and occupation).

Chart: Higher Poverty Rates for Latin America's Indigenous

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Portuguese | Français | Español

Indigenous people in Latin America account for less than 8% of the population, yet make up more than 17% of the region's extremely poor, due to a persistent pattern of social exclusion. Read More and download the report "Indigenous Latin America in the twenty-first century"
 

Chart: Pakistan Leads South Asia in Mobile Money

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية

In 2014, an average of 3% of people in South Asia used a mobile phone to send or receive money. While there are still gaps between how often men and women use these services, Pakistan leads the region with 9% of men and 2% of women moving money on their mobiles. You can find more data on financial inclusion in the Global Findex Database
 

Chart: By 2030, Delhi’s Population Will Approach Tokyo’s

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Español | 中文 | Français
According to the UN's World Urbanization Prospects, by 2030, the world is projected to have 41 mega-cities with more than 10 million inhabitants each. Tokyo is expected to remain the world’s largest city in 2030, followed closely by Delhi. The fastest-growing cities will be in Asia and Africa.

But what exactly is a city?

Chandan Deuskar's blog explores exactly this question. There's currently no standard definition of an "urban area" or "urban population" - each country relies on its own definition and collects data accodringly. This is an important area of data to improve - the Sustainable Development Goals include many indicators and targets explicity concerning cities and new standards and approaches such as using satellite imagery may provide more accurate data and definitions. 
 

Chart: the future price of oil?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | 中文 | Español | 日本語

The World Bank's forecast for the average oil price in 2016 is $37 per barrel. Commodity Markets Outlook provides a quarterly analysis of international commodity markets, and the oil forecast reflects factors including a slowing global economy, high oil inventories and unchanged OPEC policy prioritizing market share.
 

Chart: $1 Trillion in Telecom Investment since 1990

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français

Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) bring together the private sector and governments to provide public infrastructure. The total investment in infrastructure was $25.3 billion in the first half of 2015. The PPP Knowledge Lab brings together data and reports on these projects.

Latin America's unemployed and out of school youth

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Español


Throughout Latin America, youth who are neither working nor in school are often labeled ninis, from the Spanish phrase “ni estudia ni trabaja" (neither studies nor works). One in five youth in the region is a nini, and the increase in their number since 1992 has been entirely due to young men. Read more in the new paper: "Out of School and Out of Work : Risk and Opportunities for Latin America’s Ninis"
 

Four charts on gender gaps we still need to close

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | العربية | Français | Español | 日本語

The World Bank Group has just launched a new gender data portal that brings together sex-disaggregated and gender-relevant data on topics ranging from education, demographics, and health to jobs, asset ownership, and political participation. We’ve also just released the Little Data Book on Gender 2016 along with online tables that are linked to the latest data available in the World Development Indicators

Gender data are one of the most visited parts of our data site, and these new resources make it easier than ever to see our data’s gender dimensions. The country and topic dashboards give an overview of the distribution and trends in data across important themes, and the online tables and book are a useful reference for the most commonly accessed data. 

Below I’ve picked a few charts from the new portal related to the four pillars of the Bank Group’s new gender equality strategy. These aims focus on improving human endowments, through better access to health, education, and social protection; opening up more and better jobs by tackling issues such as skills gaps and care arrangements; expanding women’s access to and control over assets;  and enhancing women’s voice and agency, meaning their ability to make themselves heard and exert control over key aspects of their own lives.
 

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