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Sub-national Malnutrition Data

Vanessa Moreira da Silva's picture
Also available in: Español | Français | 中文 | العربية

There is a growing perception that spatial disparities in development indicators within countries are becoming more pronounced. Sub-national data are needed to inform policy makers on such matters. However, data on the sub-national level is less frequent (curated in a global setting) because sub-national administrative areas change frequently.

World Bank to publish Purchasing Power Parities in March 2014

Grant Cameron's picture
In June 2013 we announced the upcoming release of the results from the 2011 round of the International Comparison Program (ICP). The results will include ICP 2011 benchmark PPPs and related volume measures for 199 participating countries/economies.

The Global State of AIDS in 4 Charts

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Español | Français | العربية

Yesterday was World Aids Day - an annual event to raise awareness about HIV and the global fight against it. When it comes to international data about HIV and AIDS, the cross-organisational UNAIDS program publishes age and gender disaggregated data on indicators such as prevalence, new infections and deaths. In turn, we incorporate some of these data into the World Development Indicators

Here are some highlights from the data that have been released:

1) There are more adults and children living with HIV than ever before

In 2012, there were an estimated 35.3 million adults and children living with HIV in the world. The majority of these people are in Sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. As you can see from the decreasing slope of the “global” line - while people continue to become infected, the rate of new infections is going down.

You asked, we listened - open data now in 18 languages

Maryna Taran's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Español | العربية
We ask users of our open data from around the world to send us feedback. The journalists, researchers, students, developers and others we hear from, frequently ask for one thing: to make data available and accessible to the public in their local language.

indonesia-language-video
A student in Indonesia asking for World Bank data in his local language

We listened, and as part of an effort to expand access to our data, we've translated the most popular 70 indicators from the World Development Indicators into 18 local languages - spoken by over 1 billion people around the world.

What’s being done to get better data on violence against women?

Leila Rafei's picture
Also available in: 中文 | Español | Français | العربية


Violence against women occurs in all regions, religions and social classes and encompasses physical, sexual, psychological and economic violence, with even larger implications for the economic, health and social progress of societies. Yet data on this topic is hard to come by.

Today is the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, and I wanted to highlight what’s being done to get better data on the subject, and in general, what’s being done to “close the gender data gap.”
 

Everything is more fun in the Balkans: Technology, Civic Discourse, and Open Data

Samuel Lee's picture



Usually with a playful smile, it is often said that everything is more fun in the Balkans. History is alive. The region’s dynamic future is still being written and its inhabitants are as interesting and diverse as the intertwined architecture of different styles and cultures.

I had the privilege of delivering a closing keynote sharing early results of an Open Data Demand pilot project (currently open for consultation!) and the World Bank Group’s Open Finances experience at the Community Boost_r TechCamp held in Sarajevo from November 7-8. It was also a great opportunity to get a firsthand taste of what the civic tech scene is like across the Balkans.

The city of Sarajevo played perfect host to this hybrid conference and unconference exploring the role of data, including data for accountability and better coupling of data with technology. There was no shortage of innovation and inspiration among the thriving community of activists, development professionals, technologists, journalists, and do-gooders from every corner of the Balkans brought together by Fundacja TechSoup and Zašto ne (Bosnia & Herzegovina) in partnership with Dokukino (Serbia), and the IPKO Foundation (Kosovo).

What does "life expectancy at birth" really mean?

Emi Suzuki's picture
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If a child is born today in a country where the life expectancy is 75, they can expect to live until they are 75… right?

Not exactly. 

The statistic “Life expectancy at birth” actually refers to the average number of years a newborn is expected to live if mortality patterns at the time of its birth remain constant in the future. In other words, it’s looking at the number of people of different ages dying that year, and provides a snapshot of these overall “mortality characteristics” that year for the population.

उनकी वाणी में बोलना – “विश्व बैंक समूह के वित्त” बहुभाषी हो गया है

Prasanna Lal Das's picture

हमारी दुनिया आँकड़ों की बढ़ती हुई मात्रा से भरी हुई है, परन्तु संभावित दर्शकों के लिए ये आँकड़े कम उपयोगी होते हैं जिसका सबसे स्वाभाभिक कारण है - आँकड़े उनकी भाषा ही नहीं बोलते हैं।

Looking beyond open data: hacking online behavior with... alliteration

Tariq Khokhar's picture

Although I now live in Washington DC, I’m from Cambridge in England.  I still like to keep track of my Member of Parliament (MP) back home, Julian Huppert, using a site first developed in 2004 by mySociety called TheyWorkForYou.

It presents an aggregation of data on MPs  from sources including official transcripts of parliamentary discussions (Hansard), election results, the Register of Interests and Wikipedia entries. In short, it’s a “digital dossier” on all of the country’s parliamentarians. 

But take another look at Jullian’s page and the “Numerology” section halfway down.  Isn’t it reassuring to see that he: “Has used three-word alliterative phrases (e.g. "she sells seashells") 244 times in debates — average amongst MPs.”

Huh?

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