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April 2018

Q1 2018 update of World Development Indicators available

World Bank Data Team's picture
Also available in: Français

The World Development Indicators database has been updated. This is a regular quarterly update to 1,600 indicators and includes both new indicators and updates to existing indicators. 

This release features updates for national accounts, balance of payments, demography, health, labor market, poverty and shared prosperity, remittances, and tourism series. New estimates are also available for electricity-related indicators from the Global Tracking Framework, adjusted net savings, law and regulation towards gender equality from Women, Business and the Law, ownership of financial accounts from the Global Findex, mobile and internet, and education series.

New indicators include those for health expenditures, value added per worker by sector, sex-disaggregated indicators on the completeness of birth registration, export/import unit value index, population exposed to PM2.5 pollution by interim target level and net ODA provided. For the latest list of additions, deletions, and changes in codes, descriptions, definitions, see here.

To accompany the data, a new online edition of World Development Indicators featuring stories, documentation and discovery tools will be available in Summer 2018. 

Data can be accessed via various means including:

- The World Bank’s main multi-lingual and mobile-friendly data website, http://data.worldbank.org 
- The DataBank query tool: http://databank.worldbank.org which includes archived versions of WDI
Bulk download in XLS and CSV formats and directly from the API
 

Why time use data matters for gender equality—and why it’s hard to find

Eliana Rubiano-Matulevich's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español
Photo: © Stephan Gladieu / World Bank

Time use data is increasingly relevant to development policy. This data shows how many minutes or hours individuals devote to activities such as paid work, unpaid work including household chores and childcare, leisure, and self-care activities. It is now recognized that individual wellbeing depends not just on income or consumption, but also on how time is spent. This data can therefore improve our understanding of how people make decisions about time, and expand our knowledge of wellbeing.

Time use data reveals how, partly due to gender norms and roles, men and women spend their time differently. There is an unequal distribution of paid and unpaid work time, with women generally bearing a disproportionately higher responsibility for unpaid work and spending proportionately less time in paid work than men.

How do women and men spend their time?

In a forthcoming paper with Mariana Viollaz (Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina), we analyze gender differences in time use patterns in 19 countries (across 7 regions and at all levels of income). The analysis confirms the 2012 World Development Report findings of daily disparities in paid and unpaid work between women and men.

Can modern technologies facilitate spatial and temporal price analysis?

Marko Rissanen's picture
Also available in: Français

The International Comparison Program (ICP) team in the World Bank Development Data Group commissioned a pilot data collection study utilizing modern information and communication technologies in 15 countries―Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Cambodia, Colombia, Ghana, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Peru, Philippines, South Africa, Venezuela and Vietnam―from December 2015 to August 2016.

The main aim of the pilot was to study the feasibility of a crowdsourced price data collection approach for a variety of spatial and temporal price studies and other applications. The anticipated benefits of the approach were the openness, accessibility, level of granularity, and timeliness of the collected data and related metadata; traits rarely true for datasets typically available to policymakers and researchers.

The data was collected through a privately-operated network of paid on-the-ground contributors that had access to a smartphone and a data collection application designed for the pilot. Price collection tasks and related guidance were pushed through the application to specific geographical locations. The contributors carried out the requested collection tasks and submitted price data and related metadata using the application. The contributors were subsequently compensated based on the task location and degree of difficulty.

The collected price data covers 162 tightly specified items for a variety of household goods and services, including food and non-alcoholic beverages; alcoholic beverages and tobacco; clothing and footwear; housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels; furnishings, household equipment and routine household maintenance; health; transport; communication; recreation and culture; education; restaurants and hotels; and miscellaneous goods and services. The use of common item specifications aimed at ensuring the quality, as well as intra- and inter-country comparability, of the collected data.

In total, as many as 1,262,458 price observations―ranging from 196,188 observations for Brazil to 14,102 observations for Cambodia―were collected during the pilot. The figure below shows the cumulative number of collected price observations and outlets covered per each pilot country and month (mouse over the dashboard for additional details).

Figure 1: Cumulative number of price observations collected during the pilot

5 Reasons to Check out the World Bank’s new Data Catalog

Malarvizhi Veerappan's picture
Also available in: العربية | Français | Español

Please help us out by completing this short user survey on the new data catalog.

Data is the key ingredient for evidence based policy making. A growing family of artificial intelligence techniques are transforming how we use data for development. But for these and more traditional techniques to be successful, they need a foundation in good data. We need high quality data that is well managed, and that is appropriately stored, accessed, shared and reused.

The World Bank’s new data catalog transforms the way we manage data. It provides access to over 3,000 datasets and 14,000 indicators and includes microdata, time series statistics, and geospatial data.

Open data is at the heart of our strategy

Since its launch in 2010, the World Bank’s Open Data Initiative has provided free, open access to the Bank’s development data. We’ve continuously updated our data dissemination and visualization tools, and we’ve supported countries to launch their own open data initiatives.

We’re strong advocates for open data, but we also recognize that some data, often by virtue of how it has been acquired or the subjects it covers, may have limitations on how it can be used. In the new data catalog, rather than having such data remain unpublished, we’re making many of these previously unpublished datasets available, and we document any restrictions on how they can be used. This new catalog is an extension of the open data catalog and relies heavily on the work previously done by the microdata library.