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October 2016

What do we know about remittances and forced displacement?

Kirsten Schuettler's picture
Over 65 million persons were forcibly displaced worldwide due to conflict and persecution at the end of 2015. Many of them remain displaced for a long period of time. Personal transfers sent to refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) can contribute to livelihoods in protracted situations and increase self-reliance. Existing evidence suggests that they can be an important source of income, sent from the diaspora in third countries or from families and friends left behind. They can also play an important role in helping set up economic activities in protracted situations.

Local leaders cooperating internationally on migration

Colleen Thouez's picture
The centrality of cities and regional governments in crafting solutions to trans-national challenges was just reasserted with the adoption of the new Urban Development Agenda in Quito last week, on 20 October. For international migration as for climate change, local leaders are increasingly collaborating across national borders to succeed. For instance, in the context of an inter-EU city solidarity network for refugees in Greece recently launched, the Mayors of Athens and Barcelona agreed to relocate 100 refugees between their cities.

Trends in Remittances, 2016: A New Normal of Slow Growth

Dilip Ratha's picture
Against a backdrop of tepid global growth, remittance flows to low and middle income countries (LMICs) seem to have entered a “new normal” of slow growth. In 2016, remittance flows to LMICs are projected to reach $442 billion, marking an increase of 0.8 percent over 2015 (figure 1 and table 1). The modest recovery in 2016 is largely driven by the increase in remittance flows to Latin America and the Caribbean on the back of a stronger economy in the United States; by contrast remittance flows to all other developing regions either declined or recorded a deceleration in growth.