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How do you plan relocations to protect people from the effects of natural disasters and climate change?

Elizabeth Ferris's picture
Governments have a responsibility to protect their people, including from disasters and the effects of climate change.  Sometimes that means relocating them to safer areas.  Given that the effects of climate change, exacerbated by settlement patterns and pre-existing vulnerabilities, it seems likely that more people will have to be moved from their original habitats in the future. Millions have been uprooted in the past month from massive floods in places as divergent as South Asia and South Texas.

Remittances to developing countries decline for an unprecedented 2nd year in a row

Dilip Ratha's picture
We just launched the latest edition of the Migration and Development Brief and an accompanying Press Release.
 
Remittances to developing countries decreased by 2.4 percent to an estimated $429 billion in 2016. This is the second consecutive year that remittances have declined. Such a trend has not been seen in the last 30 years. Even during the global financial crisis, remittances contracted only during 2009, bouncing back in the following year.

Call for Proposals: Evaluation of KNOMAD

Dilip Ratha's picture
The Global Knowledge Partnership on Migration and Development (KNOMAD) is seeking proposals for an evaluation of its first phase that started in July 2013 (the project end date is June 2018). This end of phase evaluation will assess KNOMAD’s implementation and its operations in relation to the stated objectives (see the <<Terms of Reference>> including professional qualifications). This evaluation should address institutional learning and provide recommendations for the strategic and forward-looking positioning of KNOMAD in the second phase.

India introduces pre-departure orientation for migrant workers

T.L.S. Bhaskar's picture
All holders of Indian passports, whose educational qualification is below Matric/X Class (the equivalent of 10th grade in the American system) have a notation ‘Emigration Check Required (ECR)’ stamped in their passports. Under the Emigration Act of 1983, they are required to obtain an Emigration Clearance (EC) while migrating to 18 notified countries[i] for employment/work.

Why taxing remittances is a bad idea

Dilip Ratha's picture
In 2016, migrant remittance flows to developing countries amounted to $440 billion, more than three times the size of official development aid flows. In many countries, remittances are the largest source of foreign exchange. In India and Mexico, they are larger than foreign direct investment; in Egypt, they are larger than the revenue from Suez Canal; and in Pakistan, they are larger than the country’s international reserves.

Looking to the future: Ensuring better job opportunities for Tajikistan’s youth

Mohamed Ihsan Ajwad's picture
A significant share of Tajikistan’s workforce works outside the country. 
Photo: Gennadiy Ratushenko / World Bank

My colleague Victoria and I had an opportunity recently to meet with students at the Tajik-Russian Slavonic University in Dushanbe, Tajikistan, as part of our research and preparation for a new report called Tajikistan Jobs Diagnostic: Strategic Framework for Jobs.

Curious to learn about their future professional ambitions, we asked one class of students how many of them would like to work in the private sector after they graduate. Only about 10% of the students raised their hands. We also asked them how many would like to work for the government. This time, around 20% raised their hands.

Digital Remittances and Global Financial Health

John Kunze's picture
In 2015, there were 244 million international immigrants – the highest number ever recorded and up 12 million from 2013. The 2016 numbers will no doubt be higher. Many immigrants move to new countries in search of a better life. Some are escaping poverty, war, or famine; others are seeking an education; and some simply want to start anew.

A second regularization campaign for irregular immigrants in Morocco: When emigration countries become immigration countries

Kirsten Schuettler's picture
How to deal with irregular migrants is not only discussed in the United States. Also low- and middle- income countries need to find answers to this question. Morocco launched a second regularization campaign last month. Although it is still primarily an emigration country, Morocco has increasingly become a transit and also an immigration country. Since the 2000s it has received an increasing number of migrants and refugees from sub-Saharan Africa, Syria, and Europe.

Demonetization in India: Short and long term impact on remittances.

Supriyo De's picture
In observance of the International Migrants Day, Dec 18

The Indian government issued orders withdrawing the validity of existing high denomination (Rs. 500 and Rs. 1000) currency notes on 8th November 2016. Newer currency notes (Rs. 500 and Rs. 2000) were issued subsequently. The move was aimed at tackling counterfeit currency notes and those hoarding untaxed or illicit income. The impact on formal international inward remittances was minimal.  MTOs doing cash payouts were impacted in the short run due to unavailability of large denomination currency. Families of migrants also reported problems in withdrawing remittances from ATMs. Formal international outflows were not affected since these are usually made out of bank accounts.

The Business Case for Migration promoted by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI)

In observance of the International Migrants Day, Dec 18

We live in an increasingly globalizing world, characterized by the transnational movement of goods, services, people and ideas. Yet, the merits of international migration have been underestimated. In fact, migration has recently been at the wrong end of the stick; its discourse the world over driven by political rhetoric with populism, xenophobia, issues of security and the flag of sovereignty and nationality as its principal tools.
 

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