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Migration and Development: A Global Compact on Migration

Dilip Ratha's picture
In observance of the International Migrants Day, Dec 18

The 9th Global Forum on Migration and Development marked a successful continuation of a global process that addresses one of the most contentious issues in the global development agenda. As States intensify efforts to define the Global Compact on Safe, Orderly, Regular Migration, there is a need to systematically identity core thematic elements, the normative framework, and a process of meetings and negotiations in the run-up to the proposed UN International Conference in 2018.

What if Africa calls upon its diaspora to boost economic transformation?

Nadege Desiree Yameogo's picture
In observance of the International Migrants Day, Dec 18

The stock of African migrants in 2015 was estimated at about 23.2 million (Migration and Remittances Factbook 2016: and the top emigration countries are mostly fragile and poor (see Table 1). About 31.1% of Sub-Saharan Africans migrate to high-income countries compared to 90% in North Africa. The leading destination of these migrants include France, Saudi Arabia, USA, UK, Spain, and Italy. The second generation of African diaspora in the Western hemisphere was estimated at 1.1 million in 2012, and most of them live in Australia, Europe, and the USA.
 

Putting the spot-light on worker-paid recruitment cost

Ganesh Seshan's picture
In observance of the International Migrants Day, Dec 18

The United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, in particular Goal 10.7, calls for a facilitating safe, orderly and responsible migration through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.
 

Request for Proposals: Synthesizing Evidence to Understand if Remittances Reach the Poorest; Its Impact on Resilience of the Poorest; and Lessons Learned in the Context of Climate Change

Dilip Ratha's picture

The Climate Policy Team of the World Bank in partnership with the Global Knowledge Partnership on Migration and Development (KNOMAD) is commissioning a paper in above mentioned topic. This paper will inform the work underway in a flagship report on “Climate Change, Migration and Securing Resilience” being led by the Climate Policy Team.

Call for Papers: Impacts of Refugees and IDPs on Host Countries and Host Communities

Dilip Ratha's picture
Nearly 65 million persons were forcibly displaced worldwide – within and across borders – due to conflict and persecution at the end of 2015. Forced displacement is not only a humanitarian issue, but also has important economic, social, political, and environmental impacts on the places of origin and destination.

What do we know about remittances and forced displacement?

Kirsten Schuettler's picture
Over 65 million persons were forcibly displaced worldwide due to conflict and persecution at the end of 2015. Many of them remain displaced for a long period of time. Personal transfers sent to refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) can contribute to livelihoods in protracted situations and increase self-reliance. Existing evidence suggests that they can be an important source of income, sent from the diaspora in third countries or from families and friends left behind. They can also play an important role in helping set up economic activities in protracted situations.

Local leaders cooperating internationally on migration

Colleen Thouez's picture
The centrality of cities and regional governments in crafting solutions to trans-national challenges was just reasserted with the adoption of the new Urban Development Agenda in Quito last week, on 20 October. For international migration as for climate change, local leaders are increasingly collaborating across national borders to succeed. For instance, in the context of an inter-EU city solidarity network for refugees in Greece recently launched, the Mayors of Athens and Barcelona agreed to relocate 100 refugees between their cities.

Trends in Remittances, 2016: A New Normal of Slow Growth

Dilip Ratha's picture
Against a backdrop of tepid global growth, remittance flows to low and middle income countries (LMICs) seem to have entered a “new normal” of slow growth. In 2016, remittance flows to LMICs are projected to reach $442 billion, marking an increase of 0.8 percent over 2015 (figure 1 and table 1). The modest recovery in 2016 is largely driven by the increase in remittance flows to Latin America and the Caribbean on the back of a stronger economy in the United States; by contrast remittance flows to all other developing regions either declined or recorded a deceleration in growth.  

Building Contact between Immigrants and Host Communities is Vital to Integration –And Should be a Central Goal of the UN Summit on Refugees and Migrants

Jonas Bergmann's picture
Negative Beliefs and Attitudes Towards Immigrants Threaten Effective Integration

The growing scale of human mobility worldwide has rendered immigration a salient topic. Better integration could yield significant benefits to migrants, host societies and governments (and even to sending regions) (Cervan-Gil, 2016): Inclusion facilitates self-sufficiency and human development, which in turn reduces welfare costs, raises tax income, and improves social cohesion (OECD 2016).
 

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