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Web 2.0 for Development Professionals Part 2: Innovative Uses of Existing Cloud Services

Tanya Gupta's picture

In my last blog I wrote about some useful cloud based services that could be used by development professionals for their convenience, and also for understanding the broader implications of moving towards the cloud.  Today we will look at some innovative uses of cloud services.  

A service or a tool is only as good as the use you make of it.  Two interesting uses of cloud services are the use of Google Docs to do surveys, and the potential for real time collaboration. 

The impact evaluation roller coaster

Markus Goldstein's picture

I was recently talking with one of my younger colleagues and she was lamenting something that was going wrong in an impact evaluation she was working on. She was thinking of throwing in the towel and shutting down the work.   This reminded me of the horrible feeling in the pit of my stomach when I started doing impact evaluation (as well as research more generally) when something went wrong.   Now, of course, I am bald…

Prospects Weekly: Euro Area woes have worsened on growing concerns about banking-sector exposures

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

Euro Area woes have worsened on growing concerns about banking-sector exposures to sovereign obligations and skepticism about the medium-term solvency of several high-spread member countries. A crisis of confidence has taken hold, partly prompted by the apparent inability of politicians to get in front of the crisis. Unlike previous episodes of volatility, contagion to core Euro Area countries and abroad—including developing countries—has taken hold.

How are Bangladeshi Migrants Who Fled the Libya Conflict Starting Afresh?

Naomi Ahmad's picture

Earlier this year, Mohammed Faruk Ahmed was one of 37,000 Bangladeshi migrant workers forced to flee the conflict in Libya.

Forsaking his job and only source of income, he returned home empty handed. Watch this video to know how returnee migrants like Ahmed, now have a chance to rebuild their life, thanks to a World Bank-sponsored initiative to repatriate and support Bangladeshi migrants from Libya.

Building for growth, not elites

Caroline Freund's picture
The media is widely reporting the discovery of a labyrinth of air-conditioned tunnels under the Gadhafi complex. By the time Saddam Hussein was removed from power, he had built close to 80 palaces in Iraq, with his initials carved into their walls, columns and ceilings. This is of course not unique to the region. Ceausescu’s House of the Republic remains the world’s second largest building, with over 1000 rooms and nearly 500 crystal chandeliers.These extravagant structures highlight why infrastructure investments are often not growth enhancing in the absence of good governance.  Without transparency and accountability, questionable spending goes unpunished.

On the Front Line of Climate Change....Buildings!

David Lawrence's picture

Efforts to fight climate change tend to focus on emissions, usually dirty ones, like vehicle exhaust or the toxic belching of coal-fired power plants. A blast of diesel fumes in your face is a good reminder that these things are bad for both people and the planet. So it’s no surprise that we zero in on cheerful, clean solutions, like solar power and zippy electric cars.

Moving from Internal to External Validity – and problems with Partner Selection Bias

David McKenzie's picture

When done well, randomized experiments at least provide internal validity – they tell us the average impact of a particular intervention in a particular location with a particular sample at a particular point in time. Of course we would then like to use these results to predict how the same intervention would work in other locations or with other groups or in other time periods.


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