Syndicate content

Simple joys

Planting a tree is a beautiful, simple gesture. I was moved watching the Nobel Peace Laureate Prof Wangari Maathai plant a tree with Kathy Sierra, World Bank Vice President and Head of the Sustainable Development Network, on the margins of the UN Climate Change Conference.

Doing Business: Aguascalientes leads Mexico

Doing Business in Mexico 2007, released today, tracks all 31 Mexican states on 4 areas of regulation - starting a business, registering property, getting credit and enforcing contracts. As the most populous city, Mexico City is the yardstick that earned Mexico's 43rd place rank on the global rankings. But the subnational report puts Mexico City 10th, behind the much-reformed Queretaro - last year's worst performer.

Reassurance

Some might call the talks on Climate Change a little schizophrenic - one arm is trying to mitigate climate change, while the other is busy thinking of ways to adapt to climate change's impact. Now add a third layer: insurance, a precaution in case adaptation to climate change proves impossible.

Clean technology transfer: a private sector issue

Now in its second week, the UN Climate Change Conference (UNFCCC) in Nairobi is focusing on three issues:

  • the creation of a climate change adaptation fund
  • a better geographical distribution of the Clean Development Mechanism (i.e. there’s too little of it in Africa), and
  • the transfer of clean technologies from North to South.

Although the last point is considered here a governmental issue, I would argue it is truly a private sector one. Why?

Why doesn't capital flow from rich to poor countries?

Yan Wang's picture

While global cross border capital flows have risen to reach nearly $6 trillion in 2004, only a small fraction (about 10%) flows to developing countries.  People cannot help but ask, Why doesn't capital flow from rich to poor countries?  In a recent conference, Prof Enrique G.

Fridays Academy: Governance

Ignacio Hernandez's picture

From Raj Nallari and Breda Griffith's lecture notes.

 

At least six dimensions of governance are referred to repeatedly in the literature. These are: (i) voice and accountability, (ii) political stability, (iii) government effectiveness, (iv) regulatory quality, (v) rule of law, and (vi) control of corruption (Kaufmann and Kraay 2002).

 

 

Income per capita and Voice and Accountability


Pages