Syndicate content

The Reading List: May 22

Sameer Vasta's picture

Apologies for the lack of posts this week: I've been at the O'Reilly Where 2.0 Conference learning more about the geo-spatial web. Lots of neat things coming out of the conference, and I'll be posting more about them in the days to come, promise. In the meantime...

Every Friday — well, Saturday this week — I'm going to try and post a selection of the links from our delicious.com account so you can get a quick snapshot of what we're reading this week. Here goes:
 

The verdict is in on microfinance

Ryan Hahn's picture

And it's not pretty. The results from the first large-scale randomized trial of access to microfinance indicate that it comes up short in many areas of human development. 52 of 104 slums in Hyderabad were randomly selected to receive new branches of a microfinance outfit called Spandana. Abhijit Banerjee and the other randomistas from the Poverty Action Lab describe the results in The Miracle of Microfinance?

"ICT is both an icon and an engine of innovation"

Michael Trucano's picture

image courtesy of infoDevAt the end of last week's blog post I mentioned the new Educational Technology Debate web site sponsored by infoDev and UNESCO.  Every month, this site will offer up a topic for consideration, and two discussants will stake out positions on (roughly) opposite sides to kick off what is meant to be a lively on-line 'back-and-forth' in the subsequent weeks.  The first question for debate asks,

Carbon Expo: A marketplace to finance environmental change

Florian Kitt's picture

Carbon finance sounds boring and technical and not much fun. However, it actually does a lot of good and can help fund critical environmental preservation projects as well as introduce clean and renewable technologies in both developed and developing countries.

Formal firms with informal workers

In my last post, I claimed that “it is common for formal firms to have many informal workers.” How do I know that?

Joyce Sadka and I have been doing some work using data from a labor court in Cuautitlán, which is located just outside of Mexico City. Each data point represents an individual who claimed to have been fired from a formal-sector firm without cause.

What's the opposite of a boycott?

The answer is a "carrotmob".

Imagine going around to the shopkeepers in your neighbourhood and asking them what percentage of their sales they would be willing to invest in improving their energy efficiency. Identify the highest bidder and, using social media, you mobilise the local community to "mob" their shop on a mutually agreed date. Document everything on YouTube and get others to repeat the experiment around the world.


Pages