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Corruption Hunters: A Virtual Discussion

Dina Elnaggar's picture

Over the past year, the World Bank Integrity Vice Presidency has set up Regional Corruption Hunters Alliances in different parts of the world.  This alliance brings together anticorruption officials who can support Bank efforts in protecting the integrity of its projects.  The Bank will convene the first meeting of the International Corruption Hunters Alliance in December 2010 under the theme: Time for Action. 

For the next 10 days, we will host a virtual discussion on this blog, to focus on some of the issues that are relevant to the work of the ICHA members and the global anticorruption momentum that the Bank and other development partners are contributing to.
 

Five Key Networks You Will Find Everywhere

Antonio Lambino's picture

 

The video posted above is the second in a series we are featuring on this blog.  The interview was conducted last June, during a learning event jointly organized by the World Bank Institute’s Governance Practice and CommGAP entitled “The Political Economy of Reform: Moving from Analysis to Action.” The event’s primary objective was to bring together relevant expertise and take stock of experiences from around the world on the ways in which political economy analyses have been and can be made more operationally relevant.  Featured in the video is Rakesh Rajani, head and founder of Twaweza (“we can make it happen” in Swahili), a “citizen-centered initiative, focusing on large-scale change in East Africa.”  From years of experience working in Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania, Rajani describes five local networks that he has found exist everywhere in these countries:

They are organic.  They are powerful.  They go to scale.  They matter to people’s lives.  People invest in those networks.  And they would be there even if every aid dollar dried up tomorrow… And you’ll notice that those five are typically not the organizations or the institutions that development actors work with.

Who's listening to the "knowledge bank"?

Adam Wagstaff's picture

We now know quite a lot about the supply of research on development, and about the part the World Bank plays. We know that the World Bank publishes a lot, that most research in the world is by researchers in high-income countries, and that were it not for the Bank there would be far fewer journal articles about developing countries.

We know much less about the demand for development research and Bank publications in particular. We know that Bank publications get cited a lot in scholarly journals, books, and technical reports. What we don’t know is: who is reading and citing the Bank’s work?  

An optimist would argue that Bank authors get read largely by people in developing countries, and this in turn helps move policy forward. A cynic would argue that the audience for Bank publications is largely made up of others in the North working on international development. Bank reports that end up in developing countries are, according to this view, at risk of being turned into papier-mâche masks for puppet shows. We call this the "puppeteers view".

Does efficient corruption pay?

Mohammad Amin's picture

Buying and selling a product or service involves a number of costs, including time spent searching for the best prices, negotiating for good discounts, researching product quality and writing contracts where applicable. Broadly, these are called the transaction costs of economic exchange, and part of the reason firms exist is to keep transaction costs at a minimum.

I want solar, and I want it now!

Nahla Benslama's picture

Do you believe in the power of the sun? Are you a supporter of solar energy, the “fastest growing energy source in the world?"

If yes, then you might be interested in signing the Solar Petition of the SolarCOP16, brought by the European Photovoltaic Industry Association (EPIA) and the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA).

New data visualizers for trade data

World Bank Data Team's picture

In September 2010, the World Bank launched the new web-based World Integrated Trade Solution (WITS) system. The WITS software has been developed by the World Bank, in close collaboration and consultation with various international organizations, including United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), International Trade Center (ITC), United Nations Statistical Division (UNSD), and World Trade Organization (WTO).

WANTED (a communication professional to save WikiLeaks and) JULIAN ASSANGE

Naniette Coleman's picture

Stockholm Criminal Court warrants, rumors that the US Senate will dub Julian Assange a “transnational threat”, conspiracy theories, and all other charges aside, the international transparency vessel that is WikiLeaks started sending out mayday signals the day that Daniel Domscheit-Berg (alias Daniel Schmitt) stepped down as spokesperson for WikiLeaks.   I believe that many  of the organizations problems began when founder and spokesperson became one-and-the-same.


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