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People, Spaces, Deliberation Bids Farewell

Roxanne Bauer's picture
Dear Readers,

The People, Spaces, Deliberation blog has, after a long and happy run, been retired. We wanted to take a moment to share some highlights and let you know we are grateful for your loyal readership and the community we created together. 
 
Established in January 2008 by its editor, Sina Odugbemi, the blog was one of the most popular World Bank blogs during much of its duration. Our success was thanks to the many World Bank and guest bloggers who contributed posts, shared their ideas, and engaged in conversations. 
 

The Early Grade Bottlenecks and Low Completion Rates in Africa

Sajitha Bashir's picture



Countries in Africa are facing a conundrum according to a recent World Bank flagship report, “Facing Forward: Schooling for Learning in Africa.” Over the past 10 to 25 years, many have made tremendous progress in getting children into classrooms. Yet, while total enrollment has increased, in many of these same countries primary school completion rates have not.

Across Africa, disaster risk finance is putting a resilient future within reach

Hugo Wesley's picture
The Africa Disaster Risk Financing Initiative supports agriculture insurance programs which unlock critical assess to credit for low-income farmers in Kenya, as well as in Uganda and Rwanda. Photo Credit: World Bank


Sub-Saharan Africa knows more than its fair share of disasters induced by natural hazards. The past few months alone have seen drought in the Horn of Africa, floods in Mali and Rwanda, and landslides in Ethiopia and Uganda. Between 2005 and 2015, the region experienced an average of 157 disasters per year, claiming the lives of roughly 10,000 people annually.

Top Ten Development Impact Blog Posts of 2018

David Evans's picture

Yemen’s private sector teaming up to support humanitarian and recovery efforts

Sami Sofan's picture


Since 2015, the Republic of Yemen has been overtaken by a brutal conflict that has resulted in massive casualties, hundreds of thousands of internally displaced families, substantial infrastructure damage, and hampered service delivery across both the economy and society. In total, according to the 2018 Humanitarian Needs Overview from the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, approximately 22.2 million people, roughly 75 percent of the population, are in need of some manner of humanitarian or protection assistance.
 

New year’s resolutions

Pinelopi Goldberg's picture
  1. Travel no more than once per month.
  2. Despite number one above, participate in a World Bank mission to see how it really works.
  3. Despite numbers one and two above, get to Africa. It is a shame I have not been there yet.
  4. Master the WBG (World Bank Group) acronyms.
  5. Attend at least one seminar per week.
  6. Dedicate one day per week to research.
  7. Explain to the world why the global growth projections of the WB and IMF sometimes differ.
  8. Despite all of the above, continue to get my eight hours a night of sleep.

Top 8 water blogs of 2018

Li Lou's picture

The Water Blog provided plenty to chew on if you’ve been following the interesting and insightful posts we published here in 2018.

Here's a rundown of some of 2018’s most popular blogs. From wastewater treatment, to water-energy nexus, to solar pumping, and to shared sanitation, what you liked reading on The Water Blog speaks volumes about the wide-ranging topics we’ve covered and the diverse perspectives we’ve brought to the global conversation on water and sanitation issues.

Teachers and trust: cornerstones of the Finnish education system

Jaime Saavedra's picture



Public school teachers in Brazil, Indonesia or Peru have stable jobs, enjoy high level of legal protection, and are part of teacher unions that shield them politically. Public school teachers in Finland also have stable jobs and are rarely fired. They are represented by a powerful teacher union, which is very influential among other stakeholders in policy discussions. Why do student learning outcomes among these countries vary dramatically?

Tax policy should recognize the true value of user data

Simeon Djankov's picture

The latest revelations regarding covert data sharing practices by large tech companies demand governments finally take action to curb the unwanted exploitation of user data. To date, attention has been focused on privacy regulation; governments would be well served to look at tax policy, too. Digital taxes would better align taxation rights with value creation in the digital economy. They might also serve to communicate the growing frustration with abusive data management practices by the biggest offenders.


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