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Iraqi women join forces in reconstructing their country

Jocelyne Jabbour's picture


During wars, it is widely recognized that women and young people are the primary victims. Women are vulnerable to exploitation, abuse, sexual slavery, and forced recruitment into armed groups. Yet as the survivors of violent conflicts, women find reconstruction, as a window of opportunity to take a leading role in this operation. With determination and courage, they return to destroyed communities and actively, begin rebuilding infrastructure, restoring and developing traditions, laws, and customs.

Get transported to the Spring Meetings 2017 in Virtual Reality

Jimmy Vainstein's picture

The World Bank embraces innovation in many forms, including the use of Virtual Reality (VR) and 360° images to create immersive experiences that help build empathy and awareness of critical topics that affect people living in poverty.

VR is impacting the way the World Bank communicates, visualizes projects,  and improves decision making to further the Bank’s goals.

Investing in parents for a more productive and inclusive Brazil

Rita Almeida's picture
Brazil's state of Ceará has just introduced a new parenting designed to stimulate a stronger early childhood development.
Brazil's state of Ceará has just introduced a new parenting program designed to stimulate stronger early childhood development. (Photo: Julio Pantoja / World Bank)

Quality and innovative education policies emerge usually from a combination of factors such as good teachers, quality school management, and parental engagement, among others. In Brazil, a country with tremendous diversity and regional inequalities, good examples have emerged even when they are least expected. Ceará, a state in the northeast region of Brazil — where more than 500,000 children are living in rural areas and where poverty rates are high — is showing encouraging signs of success from innovative initiatives in education. The figures speak for themselves. Today, more than 70 of the 100 best schools in Brazil are in Ceará. 

Pragmatism and its discontents

Brian Levy's picture

At times in the last few years”, writes Duncan Green in his recent book How Change Happens,  “it has felt like something of a unified field theory of development is emerging”.  As Hegel reminded us, however, the owl of wisdom flies at dusk. As recently as early 2016 (which is about when he wrote these words) Green’s exuberant enthusiasm was shared by many of us. But a year, we now know, can be an eternity.

How Change Happens synthesizes a growing body of work that has aimed to move development scholarship and practice away from a pre-occupation with so-called ‘best practice’ solutions. It captures well the sensibility of the new literature – a paradoxical combination of the enthusiasm of a breakthrough and the pragmatism of seasoned practitioners who have learned the limitations of over-reach, often through bitter experience.  But, as per Hegel, has our quest for useful insight reached its destination only to find that a new journey has begun, a different and more difficult journey than the one we had planned?

In this review essay, I use the insights of How Change Happens to explore this question. I unbundle into two broad groups the categories of analysis Green uses to delineate the grand unified theory. In discussing the first group, I highlight what we got right about the drivers of change; in discussing the second, what we got wrong. I then suggest possible ways forward.

Unequal opportunity, unequal growth

Roy Van der Weide's picture

Inequality can be both good and bad for growth, depending on what inequality and whose growth. Unequal societies may be holding back one segment of the population while helping another. Similarly, high levels of inequality may be due to a variety of factors; some good, some bad for growth.

Chart: Access to Improved Water Sources is Lowest in Africa

Tariq Khokhar's picture

 

In 2015, 663 million people were drinking from unimproved sources such as unprotected dug wells. The bulk of those without were in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where rural dwellers, especially the poorest, lagged behind others in access to both water and sanitation.

Read more in "The 2017 Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals: a new visual guide to data and development"

Weekly wire: The global forum

Darejani Markozashvili's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Why people prefer unequal societies
Nature
There is immense concern about economic inequality, both among the scholarly community and in the general public, and many insist that equality is an important social goal. However, when people are asked about the ideal distribution of wealth in their country, they actually prefer unequal societies. We suggest that these two phenomena can be reconciled by noticing that, despite appearances to the contrary, there is no evidence that people are bothered by economic inequality itself. Rather, they are bothered by something that is often confounded with inequality: economic unfairness. Drawing upon laboratory studies, cross-cultural research, and experiments with babies and young children, we argue that humans naturally favour fair distributions, not equal ones, and that when fairness and equality clash, people prefer fair inequality over unfair equality. Both psychological research and decisions by policymakers would benefit from more clearly distinguishing inequality from unfairness.

2017 Affordability Report
Alliance for Affordable Internet
A4AI is a global alliance of over 80 member organisations from across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors in both developed and developing countries, dedicated to ensuring affordable internet access for all through policy and regulatory change. The Affordability Report represents part of our ongoing efforts to measure progress toward affordable internet. The 2017 Affordability Report looks at the policy frameworks in place across 58 low- and middle-income countries to determine what changes countries have made to drive prices down and expand access — and what areas they should focus on to enable affordable connectivity for all.

How MDBs are raising their game on infrastructure development

Clive Harris's picture



One year ago, the multilateral development banks (MDBs) came together for the very first time to kick off a new approach to addressing infrastructure development. The Global Infrastructure Forum, an outcome of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development, offered a platform allowing governments, MDBs, United Nations agencies, and other developmental partners to mobilize resources for infrastructure development.
 
This year, the Global Infrastructure Forum 2017 will be held on April 22nd in Washington D.C. Besides improving coordination, the Forum aims to stimulate infrastructure investment by both the public and private sectors and support implementation of infrastructure projects in developing countries.
 
Why is this important? Because the Forum brings all major players in infrastructure development to the same table around four key themes:

Putting Ideas to practice: one stop in the journey of “Inclusion Matters”

Maitreyi Bordia Das's picture
As a concept, social inclusion can be taught. Photo: World bank


I am often asked—what happened as a result of the World Bank’s 2013 flagship report, Inclusion Matters? It made a big splash in the world of ideas but what did it do to improve people’s lives? This is not to say that ideas don’t affect the lives of people, but they need to seep into practice. How do we know if a report has been relevant for development practice?

Media (R)evolutions: The pace of policy change for Internet affordability too slow, study finds

Darejani Markozashvili's picture

New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's, and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

According to the Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI), for the first time ever the internet penetration will surpass 50 percent in 2017. However, in order to reach the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of affordable, universal internet access by 2020 there is more work to be done. Especially in eliminating an existing digital gender gap, as those not connected tend to be women in developing countries unable to afford access to the Internet.

A4AI’s Affordability Report 2017 looks at the policy frameworks in place across 58 low and middle income countries and provides actionable steps countries need to take to enable affordable connectivity for all.

 


Source: Alliance for Affordable Internet

The policy recommendations of A4AI focus on employing public access solutions, promoting market competition, supporting community networks, partnering to develop technologies, incentivizing infrastructure and resource sharing, making effective use of universal service and access funds, and ensuring effective implementation.


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