Syndicate content

Social Accountability with a Coating of Comedy

Deepa Rai's picture

“Ghaas Katne Khurkera, aayo joban hurkera…” (A Nepali folk song)

It would be an injustice to my childhood if I said that this song wasn’t a part of my growing up. Even before I knew the title of the TV drama, I knew this song by heart. I, along with my friends, would happily play and sing along to it. This was a famous song from a tele-series played by Nepal’s most celebrated comedians Madan Krishna Shrestha and Hari Bansha Acharya. Like this song, Madan Krishna and Hari Bansha, endearingly abbreviated as “MaHa” has been a household name to most Nepalis, either in Nepal or residing abroad.

They have, however, been different from other Nepali comedians- their comedy stand-ups or dramas have heavy dose of social morals in their highly creative and hilarious skits. After a break of two years, they are now back on TV with one such creation that infuses issues of social accountability with comedy. The tele-drama is titled “Aan” - A Nepali expression for opening mouth – metaphor for eating/misusing government resources.
 
“The subject is very dry. This is not like soap operas where the characters have highly dramatic lives. We have to heavily rely on artists’ performances as it should be technically sound to fetch audience attention,” says Hari Bansha Acharya, the producer and the actor for “Aan”. “We have previously worked on anti-corruption but this is the first time we are reflecting the real scenario at the village, district and national level. This is a virgin topic for TV and we hope we will be able to bring the kind of result that we are anticipating.”

Prospects Daily: Japan sold record US treasures in May, German IP, export and factory orders data weaken, Turkey’s IP growth slows

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture

Financial Markets…Japan unloaded record amounts of U.S. Treasuries in May amid the steepest monthly loss for the securities in more than three years. Japanese investors reduced a net 3 trillion yen ($30 billion) of their holdings of U.S. government bonds in a fifth consecutive monthly of overall sales that were the biggest on record. Meanwhile, the country’s investors were also net sellers of foreign debt at a record volume of 2.96 trillion yen, pushing year-to-date total to 10.6 trillion yen.

10 principles to consider when introducing ICTs into remote, low-income educational environments

Michael Trucano's picture
there must be an I, a C, and a T here somewhere ...
there must be an I, a C, and a T here somewhere ...

There are, broadly speaking, two strands of concurrent thinking that dominate discussions around the use of new technologies in education around the world. At one end of the continuum, talk is dominated by words like 'transformation'. The (excellent) National Education Technology Plan of the United States (Transforming American Education: Learning Powered by Technology), for example, calls for "applying the advanced technologies used in our daily personal and professional lives to our entire education system to improve student learning, accelerate and scale up the adoption of effective practices, and use data and information for continuous improvement."

This is, if you will, a largely 'developed' country sort of discourse, where new technologies and approaches are layered upon older approaches and technologies in systems that largely 'work', at least from a global perspective. While the citizens of such countries may talk about a 'crisis' in their education systems (and may indeed have been talking about such a crisis for more than a generation), citizens of many other, much 'less developed' countries would happily switch places.
 

If you want to see a true crisis in education, come have a look at our schools, they might (and do!) say, or at least the remote ones where a young teacher in an isolated village who has only received a tenth grade education tries to teach 60+ children in a dilapidated, multigrade classroom where books are scarce and many of the students (and even more of their parents) are often functionally illiterate.


Like so many things in life, it all depends on your perspective. One country's education crisis situation may be (for better or for worse) another country's aspiration. While talk in some places may be about how new technologies can help transform education, in other places it is about how such tools can help education systems function at a basic level.

The potential uses of information and communication technologies -- ICTs -- are increasingly part of considerations around education planning in both sorts of places. One challenge for educational policymakers and planners in the remote, low income scenario is that most models (and expertise, and research) related to ICT use come from high-income contexts and environments (typically urban, or at least peri-urban). One consequence is that technology-enabled 'solutions' are imported and (sort of) 'made to fit' into more challenging environments. When they don't work, this is taken as 'evidence' that ICT use in education in such places is irrelevant (and some folks go so far to state that related discussions are irresponsible as a result).

There is, thankfully, some emerging thinking coalescing around various types of principles and approaches that may be useful to help guide the planning and implementation of ICT in education initiatives in such environments. As part of my duties at the World Bank, I have been discussing a set of such principles and approaches with a number of groups recently, and thought I'd share them here, in case they might be of wider interest or utility to anyone else. Are they universally applicable or relevant? Probably not. But the hope is that they might be useful to organizations considering using ICTs in the education sector in very challenging environments -- especially where introducing these principles and approaches into planning discussions may cause such groups to challenge assumptions and conventional wisdom about what 'works', and how best to proceed.

A Shared Vision for Human Development

Marcial Rubio Correa's picture


What do a bank and a university have in common? This is the question I asked myself when I began to write on this blog on the occasion of the visit of World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim to the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.

I came to this conclusion: The World Bank and our university share the determination to fight poverty and reduce abysmal social inequalities.

Three new papers on measuring stuff that is difficult to measure

David McKenzie's picture
There are a number of things we would like to measure for which a direct question may be refused or met with an inaccurate answer. Three new papers demonstrate some of the methods that can be used to help overcome these problems.

Paper 1: List randomization for measuring illegal migration

Quote of the Week: Frederick Douglass

Anne-Katrin Arnold's picture


"If there is no struggle, there is no progress."

- Frederick Douglass (1818 - 1895). An abolitionist and author, who dedicated his life to achieving justice for all Americans. He has also been called the father of the civil rights movement.

Quote from the speech "West India Emancipation", delivered on August 3, 1857, at Canandaigua, New York, on the twenty-third anniversary of the event.

Brazil’s protests: The bursting of a complacency bubble

Francisco Ferreira's picture

Here was an exemplary developing country – nay, emerging market! In the 2000s, Brazil’s economic growth, albeit not stellar, was certainly steady. Inequality fell continuously and markedly throughout the decade and, as a result of those two things, poverty fell from 43% of the population in 2003 to around 25% by the end of decade (using a $4/day poverty line). By the World Bank’s definition – which is considerably more demanding than the government’s – the middle class grew in size by more than 50%, to over 60 million people in 2010. Infant mortality fell. Life expectancy rose. We were going to host the World Cup and the Olympics – the only country ever to do so back-to-back with the exception of the United States. The sun was shining... What could possibly go wrong?

Then, on June 13, a relatively small demonstration against a hike in bus fares in the city of São Paulo was violently repressed by police. The following two weeks saw a remarkable eruption of street protests across hundreds of Brazilian cities, with hundreds of thousands in the streets at certain times. In a soccer-loving country, Brazil’s successes at the Confederations Cup did nothing to mitigate popular anger. On the contrary, one of the protesters’ multiple banners was indignation at the scale of spending on (and corruption from) football stadia for next year’s World Cup, while schools, hospitals and public transport are allowed to languish.

Migration and Developing Country Labor Markets

Amelie Constant's picture

In developed countries, vocal debates about how much immigration is desirable often make the headlines, but what’s the case for migration in the developing world? We recently discussed this topic with one of the leading experts on the economics of migration — Amelie Constant, Program Director of Migration at the Institute for the Study of Labor (Bonn), and a visiting professor at George Washington University and Temple University.

Prospects Daily: Portuguese bonds tumble...Eurozone PMIs signal easing downturn…China PMI indicates contraction

Global Macroeconomics Team's picture
Financial MarketsPortuguese government bonds tumbled on Wednesday, with the benchmark 10-year yield jumping as much as 139 basis points to an eight month high of 8.11% in morning trading, after two ministers resigned from the coalition government, putting at risk the country’s attempts to implement austerity measures to meet the terms of its bailout program. The cost of insuring Portugal’s bonds against default also surged to the highest level in eight months, rising as much as 105 bps to 507 bps.

World Bank published latest commodity prices: June 2013

John Baffes's picture
In June of 2013, energy prices decreased by 0.1%, while the non-energy commodities decreased by 1.5%.  Food prices are up by 0.5%, beverages dropped by 5.1%, raw materials have eased by 1.1%, metals are down by 3.7% and precious metals plunged by 5.6%.

Indices of Nominal US$ Prices, Percent Changes (April 2013 to March 2012).


Pages