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Let’s realize the potential of PPPs  

Malcolm Morley's picture


Photo: rawpixel.com | Pexels

If the potential of public-private partnerships (PPPs) is to be realized, joint working within the public sector and between the public and private sectors needs to be improved. 

Experience across the world has consistently identified that organizations find it difficult to effectively work together both within and across sectors. Issues of organizational objectives and priorities, individual and organizational sovereignty, status, power, resources, and culture act as barriers. This too often means that the potential outputs and outcomes from PPPs are not maximized.

Honduras lanza nuevo portal de transparencia de APPs

Giorgio Valentini's picture
Also available in: English




Durante la primavera pasada, Honduras dio un paso importante para mejorar la transparencia y la rendición de cuentas con respecto a las Alianzas Público Privadas (APPs) con el lanzamiento de una plataforma online que permite acceder a información detallada sobre estas iniciativas.
 
El portal, creado con el apoyo del Banco Mundial y en coordinación con la Iniciativa de Transparencia en el Sector Construcción (CoST), permite acceder a información sobre las APPs a lo largo de todo el ciclo del proyecto.Este es un logro significativo que promueve la transparencia en la planificación, la contratación, la ejecución y el monitoreo de las APPs en Honduras, haciendo que la información sea fácilmente accesible para los ciudadanos.

Honduras launches new PPP disclosure portal

Giorgio Valentini's picture
Also available in: Español



This past spring, Honduras took an important step in improving transparency and accountability with respect to Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) by launching an online platform that allows public access to detailed information about these activities.

The portal, created with the support of the World Bank and in coordination with the Construction Sector Transparency Initiative (CoST), allows access to information related to PPP projects through their entire project cycle. This is a significant achievement that promotes transparency in PPP planning, procurement, implementation and monitoring in Honduras, by making information easily accessible to citizens.

One question, eight experts, part five: Gajendra Haldea

Gajendra Haldea's picture

To gain a better understanding of how innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs) builds on genuine learning, we reached out to PPP infrastructure experts around the world, posing the same question to each. Their honest answers redefine what works — and provide new insights into the PPP process. This is the question we posed: How can mistakes be absorbed into the learning process, and when can failure function as a step toward a PPP’s long-term success?

Our fifth response in this eight-part series comes from Gajendra Haldea, Advisor to the Government of Rajasthan (India) and CEO, Bureau of Partnerships in Rajasthan. 

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

It is a truism that infrastructure projects, like much else in life, do not unfold exactly as planned. However, there is little room for failure because it would affect a large number of users for which the government would be accountable.

India happens to be the largest laboratory of PPP projects and offers a plethora of evidence. While most projects have succeeded, some have faced failure mainly because they were encumbered by lack of conceptual clarity in policy formulation as well as contractual framework.

Many assert that all future events cannot be predicted and a PPP contract must, therefore, be regarded as incomplete. They need to be reminded that if man could succeed in sending a satellite to space and operate it for several years without any ability to modify it, why can’t this be done while launching an infrastructure project?