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Forecasting infrastructure investment needs for 50 countries, 7 sectors through 2040

Chris Heathcote's picture


The Global Infrastructure Outlook is a landmark country-based online tool and report developed by the Global Infrastructure Hub with Oxford Economics, which forecasts infrastructure investment needs across 50 countries and seven sectors to 2040.

Although there are already forecasts for infrastructure investment in the market, the public and private sectors indicated their need for fresh, country-level data. Outlook was created to meet that knowledge gap.
 
For the first time we have data about what each country needs to spend in each sector, and importantly – the gap between what needs to be spent and current spending trends.

Getting the job done in tough countries

Elan Cusiac-Barr's picture


Photo Credit: J Endres via Flickr Creative Commons

I’ve spent the last 18 years in Sub-Saharan Africa working with governments on making public-private partnerships (PPPs) work for their countries. My interest is not just professional. My wife is Cameroonian and we live with our children in Senegal. I love this region! So I have a deeply personal connection that drives me, and it is important that my work has a positive impact. But the countries I work in are typically very difficult for businesses and investors to operate in and tend to have regulatory systems and investment climates that dissuade private sector investment, which is critical for PPPs to succeed. So, even though it is personally rewarding, this is not an easy job.

Public-private partnerships: Promise and hype

Michael Klein's picture
Here is a new paper I wrote that provides perspectives on patterns of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in infrastructure across time and space.  
 
PPPs are a new term for old concepts. Much infrastructure started under private auspices. Then many governments nationalized the ventures.

Governments often push infrastructure providers to keep prices low. In emerging markets, the price of water covers maybe 30 percent of costs on average, that of electricity some 80 percent of costs. This renders public infrastructure ventures dependent on subsidies. When governments run into fiscal troubles, they often look again for PPPs, and price increases. As a result, PPPs keep making a comeback in most countries, but are not always loved.