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A decade of PPPs in Latin America and the Caribbean: What have we learned?

Roland Michelitsch's picture

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Photo (right): Mr. Amarin Jitnathum / Shutterstock

The Latin America and Caribbean region (LAC) has an infrastructure gap: the region needs to invest at least 5% of GDP to cover its infrastructure needs, but is currently investing only half that. To put it mildly, there is still a lot of room for improvement for both the public and private sectors, and also for multilaterals working in the region.

In a combined effort to reduce infrastructure gaps, Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) have become, again, a popular tool since 2005. LAC was the predominant region for PPPs until the late 1990s, when investments plummeted due in part to a backlash of poorly-implemented PPPs.

Triggered by low commodity prices and rising fiscal deficits, as well as by improvements in PPP readiness, many countries established dedicated agencies and strengthened regulations leading to increases in PPP investments from $8 billion in 2005 to $39 billion in 2015. In total, LAC has seen investments of $361.3 billion in around 1,000 PPP infrastructure projects in just one decade, mostly in energy and transport.

Uma década de PPPs na América Latina e Caribe: O que aprendemos?

Roland Michelitsch's picture

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Foto (direita): Amarin Jitnathum / Shutterstock

A região da América Latina e Caribe (ALC) apresenta uma lacuna em termos de infraestrutura: a região precisa investir no mínimo 5% do PIB para atender suas necessidades neste setor, mas atualmente investe apenas metade desse percentual.  Explicando de uma forma suave, há ainda muito espaço para melhorias por parte do setor público, do setor privado, bem como das organizações multilaterais que trabalham na região.

Em um esforço combinado de reduzir as lacunas de infraestrutura, as Parcerias Público-Privadas voltaram a ser uma ferramenta popular a partir de 2005. A ALC era a região com maior predominância de PPPs até o fim dos 1990s, quando os investimentos despencaram em parte como reação adversas provocadas por PPPs mal implementadas.

Incentivados pelos preços baixos dos produtos primários e déficits fiscais crescentes, assim como pelo aprimoramento da capacidade de preparação de PPPs, muitos países criaram agências específicas e fortaleceram regulamentações que levaram ao aumento de investimentos em PPPs de US$ 8 bilhões em 2005 para US$ 39 bilhões em 2015. No total, em apenas uma década, a ALC teve investimentos de US$ 361,3 bilhões referentes a aproximadamente 1000 PPPs de projetos de infraestrutura, principalmente nos setores de energia e transportes.

Una década de alianzas público-privadas en América Latina y el Caribe: ¿qué hemos aprendido?

Roland Michelitsch's picture

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Foto (derecha): Amarin Jitnathum / Shutterstock

La región de América Latina y el Caribe registra una brecha de infraestructura: necesita invertir al menos el 5 % del producto interno bruto (PIB) para atender sus necesidades en ese sector, pero actualmente invierte solo la mitad de ese porcentaje. Por decirlo de manera suave, los sectores público y privado y las entidades multilaterales que operan en la región aún tienen mucho que mejorar.

A partir de 2005, y gracias al esfuerzo conjunto de estos actores, las alianzas público-privadas (APP) volvieron a ser una herramienta ampliamente utilizada. Hasta fines de la década de 1990, América Latina y el Caribe era la región en la que más proliferaban estos mecanismos. En ese momento, las inversiones se desplomaron debido en parte a las reacciones adversas provocadas por la implementación deficiente de las APP.

Impulsados por la disminución del precio de los productos básicos y el aumento del déficit fiscal, así como por la mejora de las condiciones para implementar APP, muchos países establecieron organismos específicos y fortalecieron las regulaciones, con lo que las inversiones mediante APP crecieron de USD 8000 millones en 2005 a USD 39 000 en 2015. En total, en apenas una década, la región de América Latina y el Caribe ha registrado inversiones de USD 361 300 millones en alrededor de 1000 proyectos de infraestructura enmarcados en APP, mayormente en los sectores de energía y transporte.

A portrait of PPPs in Latin America

Gastón Astesiano's picture


Photo: Deutsche Welle | Flickr Creative Commons 

As in many regions, countries in Latin America and the Caribbean are underinvesting in infrastructure—spending in the sector is only about half of the $300 billion needed annually to encourage growth and reduce poverty. Addressing this issue involves the successful interaction between public officials and leading infrastructure actors, particularly in the private sector. Stimulating such public-private dialogue is a priority for the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) Group, a technical partner of the Global Infrastructure Facility (GIF). Along with other partners, our recently established PPP unit supports governments, international financial institutions, and the private sector to develop infrastructure projects.
 
It was therefore a privilege for me to moderate a panel on country infrastructure programs in Latin America at the GIF’s annual Advisory Council meeting in April 2017. We covered three countries—Colombia, Argentina and Peru—at different stages of PPP market development. The findings were encouraging and illustrate a path forward for other countries in the region:

Global Infrastructure Forum maps out route towards delivering sustainable infrastructure

Amal-Lee Amin's picture



Last Saturday, tens of thousands of people gathered on the Washington D.C. mall for the March for Science alongside hundreds of sister marches around the world to coincide with Earth Day. Climate change and environmental protection were high on the agenda as the planet continues to warm and countries confront an increasing number of extreme weather events.

Meanwhile, down the road at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the 2017 Global Infrastructure Forum was in full swing, discussing how to deliver inclusive and sustainable infrastructure to ensure we achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).