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Governance

When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers

Mark Moseley's picture


Photo: shplendid | Flickr Creative Commons

Talk of trade tariffs and heightened geopolitical tensions are dominating news headlines recently. As developed economies consider escalating protectionist policies, it’s easy to forget about the situation many emerging markets face.

As outlined in the World Bank’s Global Economic Prospects report released in June this year, protectionist policies would affect emerging market and developing economies (EMDEs) more severely than advanced economies. And this is at a time where increased investment and spending in EMDEs, including in infrastructure, is sorely needed.

Let’s realize the potential of PPPs  

Malcolm Morley's picture


Photo: rawpixel.com | Pexels

If the potential of public-private partnerships (PPPs) is to be realized, joint working within the public sector and between the public and private sectors needs to be improved. 

Experience across the world has consistently identified that organizations find it difficult to effectively work together both within and across sectors. Issues of organizational objectives and priorities, individual and organizational sovereignty, status, power, resources, and culture act as barriers. This too often means that the potential outputs and outcomes from PPPs are not maximized.

Honduras lanza nuevo portal de transparencia de APPs

Giorgio Valentini's picture
Also available in: English




Durante la primavera pasada, Honduras dio un paso importante para mejorar la transparencia y la rendición de cuentas con respecto a las Alianzas Público Privadas (APPs) con el lanzamiento de una plataforma online que permite acceder a información detallada sobre estas iniciativas.
 
El portal, creado con el apoyo del Banco Mundial y en coordinación con la Iniciativa de Transparencia en el Sector Construcción (CoST), permite acceder a información sobre las APPs a lo largo de todo el ciclo del proyecto.Este es un logro significativo que promueve la transparencia en la planificación, la contratación, la ejecución y el monitoreo de las APPs en Honduras, haciendo que la información sea fácilmente accesible para los ciudadanos.

Using guarantees to drive efficiency gains in road PPPs by reducing costs

Lincoln Flor's picture


Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in transport infrastructure can offer significant efficiency gains compared to public procurement options—in the right circumstances. The gains accrue from allocating to the private sector those risks they are better able to handle than the public sector, such as those associated with construction costs.  

Data backs this up: findings in Construction Risk in Infrastructure Project Finance from EDHEC show that for a large number of transport infrastructure PPP projects, (including roads), construction overruns are significantly lower at 3.3 percent on average compared to public procurement projects, with a 26.7 percent overrun average.

More and better infrastructure services: Let’s look at governance; financing will follow

Abha Joshi-Ghani and Ian Hawkesworth's picture


Photo: AhmadArdity | Pixabay 

There are many reasons why infrastructure projects often fail to materialize, meet their timeframe, budget, or service delivery objectives. Important examples include weak and insufficient planning and assessment of affordability as well as uncertainty over the rules of the game. 

These issues severely constrain the ability of governments to mobilize finance to deliver key services that help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The World Bank estimates that achieving the SDGs would require some $4.5 trillion in public and private investment by 2030.

In light of the financing requirements for the SDGs, the World Bank has developed the Maximizing Finance for Development (MFD) approach to help governments and other stakeholders crowd in private sector solutions while optimizing the use of scarce public resources. The success of the MFD initiative will depend in large measure on whether good infrastructure governance practices and tools are adopted.
 
The World Bank Group and the African Development Bank, with support from key development partners, have organized the second Infrastructure Governance Roundtable, to be held in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, June 21-22, to foster a robust dialogue on how best to improve infrastructure governance practices to create sustainable infrastructure, and to assist with building capacity in this area.

A critical piece of the infrastructure puzzle: good governance

Chris Heathcote's picture



A major factor hindering infrastructure implementation and delivery is the absence of good governance, according to the 130 delegates from 27 countries who came together for the first Regional Roundtable on Infrastructure Governance in Cape Town in November.
 
There’s no denying infrastructure is crucial to Africa’s growth prospects. Nor can one ignore the ever-growing need for infrastructure on the continent—in Sub-Saharan Africa, only 35% of the population has access to electricity, and 23% still lack access to safe water and sanitation. Despite an estimated shortfall of nearly $100 billion in infrastructure investment in Africa, lack of financing is not the biggest problem.
 
The landmark Roundtable brought together representatives from African governments, the global private sector, multilateral and international organizations, civil society organizations and other development partners, for a discussion on the challenges and practical solutions to the governance impeding successful infrastructure delivery in Africa.

Catalyzing Change: Regional Roundtables on Infrastructure Governance

Olivier Fremond's picture
Also available in: Français


Photo: Pressmaster / Shutterstock.com

In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, policy makers focused on improving access to finance, missing the crux of the problem: governance.

In pursuit of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals through the 2015 Addis Ababa Action Agenda on financing for development, the Regional Roundtables on Infrastructure Governance* were created to promote a community of practice comprising government officials and the international development community to strengthen capacities within developing countries and establish good practices in infrastructure governance across various government sectors.

The inaugural roundtable, hosted by the Development Bank of Southern Africa, will take place in Cape Town on November 2-3, 2017, and aims to emphasize that for the commercial financing of infrastructure to be a viable option, governance reforms must happen.

Follow the money: How to cut through infrastructure’s worst red tape

David Nason's picture


(Photo: Getty Images)

There is a huge need for new and upgraded infrastructure around the world, particularly in emerging markets. Policy makers like to talk about raising trillions of dollars to fund infrastructure, but the truth is that capital for good projects exists. Regulation and lack of policy clarity are inhibitors.
 
What lacks is a strong pipeline of projects that meet societal needs and are financeable. If we can increase the quality of projects, and encourage smart and efficient regulations, the money to fund them will follow.
 
As an investor and infrastructure technology provider in 180 markets, GE surveyed its global investment, sales and policy teams for their insights on what is holding up progress.
 
We identified several areas that should be prioritized by the international community and local governments.

Sub-national pooled financing: Lessons from the United States

Kirti Devi's picture

As infrastructure projects are increasingly decentralized to sub-national governments (SNGs) in many countries, policymakers are keenly interested in developing sub-national bond markets to open up access to private-sector financing. However, the transaction costs of bond issuance are still prohibitive for small SNGs.
 
Pooled financing—through regional infrastructure funds, municipal funds, or bond banks—is being explored as a solution. Yet, many questions remain: 

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