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March 2019

Country Experience with Unsolicited PPP Proposals: Distinct, Diverse, Disparate

Deblina Saha's picture


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Don’t we all receive unsolicited advice pretty regularly? This is advice we just didn’t ask for—how we should dress, what we should eat, all the way to fundamental life choices on whom we should marry and when we should raise a family.

On very few occasions, this unsolicited advice sticks and improves our lives. But in most cases, we roll our eyes and forget about it.   

Small water enterprises need strong government

Patrick Moriarty's picture


Photo: Courtesy of Safe Water Network​

World Water Day is always a good time to take stock of where we are in achieving the water-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Most PPPs relate to relatively large investments in major infrastructure run by utilities. But in the developing world’s rapidly growing small towns and urban peripheries, we need something else.
 
Enter safe (also called small) water enterprises, an exciting group of dedicated social entrepreneurs who are beginning to gain traction providing high quality water to communities not served by utilities. For example, our friends at Safe Water Network recently announced they are now serving more than a million people in India and Ghana (more about that in this blog.) A 2017 report by Dalberg suggested a potential market of 3.9 billion people for safe water enterprises. 

Lessons from the West Bank’s first PPP: Fragile state + open mind

Malak Draz's picture


“If you want something new, you have to stop doing something old,”—good advice from innovation and management guru Peter F. Drucker. This approach was key to a PPP we coordinated in one of the world’s oldest areas, the West Bank.
 

Holding up half the sky—and some blogs

Cara Santos Pianesi's picture


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Bloggers write to share unique insights. They may want to simply share knowledge, push an issue forward, establish thought leadership, and in some cases drive business.

Bloggers also create community. For example, this blog platform reaches a subscribed community (25K in number!) interested in infrastructure finance, PPPs, and the use of guarantees to spur private-sector investments—especially in developing countries. With niche topics like this, a blogspace becomes a virtual gathering place where we can exchange war stories, spectacular examples, best practices, trends, and opinions. We can know that others care about the same topics. We can also blog to shape the demographics of discourse and raise specific voices.