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It's not about us: Building competitiveness by breaking down walls

Ivan Rossignol's picture
Workers unchain girder from delivery truck
(Credit: WSDOT, Flickr Creative Commons)

Creating 100 million jobs in developing countries will require outrageous ambition, as I discussed in my blog post in April about the Competitive Industries Practice’s work with our clients. Since then, the world’s jobs challenge has become no less severe. If anything, the outlook has worsened.

In India, where I’m based, the economic outlook has continued to deteriorate. Industrial output did not just stop growing in the last quarter: It shrank by about 1 percent. In the country with, by far, the largest number of new workers entering the global labor pool, the engine of job creation is not just stalled: It may be going in reverse. Across the developing world, including in East Asia, the last six months have seen growth slowdowns and setbacks in job creation. The slow recovery in the developed world is not reducing unemployment quickly enough, if at all.

So as we prepare to return from our summer vacations, this is a good time for World Bank staff to think about how to do things differently and how to take the lead in tackling the jobs crisis. What will it take for Competitive Industries to help our clients and counterparts deliver under these difficult circumstances?

It clearly can’t be done by the CI practice alone. Implementing solutions – fast – requires working across traditional sectors, at full speed.
 

Can cities be publicly traded?

Rana Amirtahmasebi's picture


The Charging Bull, a Wall Street symbol (Credit: Epyonmx, Flickr Creative Commons)

Apparently so.
 
The city of Nashville can now be bought and sold on the New York Stock Exchange.  Well, that is an overstatement.  More accurately, as of the opening bell on August 1st, the Nashville Area ETF (Exchange-Traded Fund) was listed on the New York Stock Exchange as NASH for about $25 a share. This is the first time that a city-based ETF has been developed.

Calling all mobile industry entrepreneurs

Maja Andjelkovic's picture


infoDev, a team within FPD, is committed to supporting promising entrepreneurs.

At infoDev, we’re fortunate to work with exciting technology startups in emerging and frontier markets every day. One of the questions we ask ourselves frequently is whether a startup team could achieve high-growth if it weren’t for the barriers they face that are specific to their local environments. These could include anything from a lack of experienced role-models and mentors, to inadequate early-stage financing, to challenging regulatory environments and the lack of an interconnected innovation ecosystem.
 

Global value chain suppliers are our connection to SMEs

Yara Salem's picture

 
SME connectors can boost the supply chains of apparel, and other industries (Credit: India Kangaroo, Flickr Creative Commons)

This is the second post in the “Supply Chain Junkie" series, which gives personal insights on supply chains- -the “new normal" of doing business that is currently being prioritized by IFC.

Fashion is about constant change and that holds true for the business strategies of apparel Global Value Chains (GVCs) in response to customer preferences and global developments. The global economic crisis has played a major role in the biggest changes to the operational model of these chains, forcing them to cut costs by further consolidating their operations through long-term strategic decisions on supplier countries and supplier firms.
 

Is the human capital 'gender gap' a matter of experience, education or both?

Mohammad Amin's picture

After a long job search, you are rewarded by the phone call all job seekers wait patiently for, the interview invitation. You prep and spend as much time on the outfit you plan to wear as you do practicing mock interviews with your friends. You get to the interview all prepared to discuss your semester abroad as a graduate student, your thesis that took you to Congo and extensive work experience that landed you coveted past jobs. Your prospective employer will be as interested in your past work experience as in your formal education or schooling. The quality and the quantity (number of years) of relevant experience could drop you out of the race all together or…land you the job, determine your pay bracket and impact your future career growth.

 


Is a solid education enough to level the gender gap in human capital? (Credit: World Bank)

When Financial Crises Attacks

11am on a Tuesday


Since 2009, the World Bank has been conducting financial crisis simulation exercises and learning valuable lessons on where institutional vulnerabilities lie. These exercises are intended to test, or simply to practice, the use of existing or proposed legal instruments, interagency and/or cross-border agreements, and other crisis management arrangements. More than 20 exercises in all world regions have been executed so far, focusing either on the interaction among top national authorities (typically between the Ministry of Finance, the Central Bank, the Bank and non-bank Supervisors, and the Deposit Insurance Agency), or on the interaction among bank supervisors of different national jurisdictions dealing with cross-border issues.

Caribbean women entrepreneurs: Smashing down walls to get to the top

Eleanor Ereira's picture


Women entrepreneurs in the Caribbean are breaking through the walls (Credit: infoDev)

In the last few decades, women in the Caribbean have made impressive strides to break through the glass ceiling and obtain positions of power and responsibility. In governments throughout the region, we’ve seen women as national leaders including Janet Jagen (Guyana), Eugenia Charles (Dominica), Portia Simpson Miller (Jamaica) and Kamla Persad-Bissessar (Trinidad). In addition, the region’s women are attaining high levels of academic achievement, and now there are more female than male college graduates in total. While this is all extremely positive news for gender equality in the Caribbean, we shouldn’t rest on our laurels just yet. There is still one area of the playing field that remains to be leveled, and not just in the Caribbean, which is women succeeding as well as men as high growth entrepreneurs.

Competitive Cities: Driving Productivity and Prosperity

Christopher Colford's picture



The future will be won or lost in the world’s cities. With half of humanity now living in cities – and with the breakneck pace of urbanization likely to concentrate two-thirds of the world’s population into metropolitan regions by 2050 – getting urbanization right is the over-arching challenge of this globalizing age.
 
Urban policy is now at the top of the news due to the bankruptcy filing of forlorn Detroit, which has long been a symbol of urban decay. Yet the urbanization drama goes far beyond the de-industrializing North: The destiny of cities worldwide will determine the success or failure of virtually every development priority – and it will be especially vital for job creation, innovation and productivity growth, environmental sustainability and social inclusion.

Value Chains and me: It’s more than just fashion

Yara Salem's picture


The value chain approach is in vogue for leading global firms and manufacturers (Credit: World Bank)

This is the first post in the “Supply Chain Junkie" series, which gives personal insights on supply chains- -the “new normal" of doing business that is currently being prioritized by IFC.


My debut in the fashion industry has not been easy, to say the least. I thought my ideas would speak for themself, but I’ve come to realize that I must significantly sharpen my design execution skills if I am to opt for a life in the fashion world. Through my journey into the ephemeral world of haute-couture and prêt-à-porter, I have come to know, understand and appreciate the brain behind the world’s leading fashion companies, including their business model, adaptive, expansionist and survival strategies and, of course, their logistics management practices. It was this very fascination with the fashion industry that made me eager to learn more about how lead fashion companies manage their products’ lifecycle and Value Chain (VC). I, thus, became more interested in the VC approach to doing business than ever. This might explain my excitement when my department at IFC decided to get into this terrain.

Why is China ahead of India? A fascinating analysis by Amartya Sen

Sebastian James's picture


Investments in education could spur economic growth in India (Credit: World Bank)

I had the wonderful opportunity to listen to my former professor Amartya Sen at the World Bank who attempted to answer this very pertinent question in the minds of many today. The fundamental question at the core is why is it that while we rate democracy as the better form of government, it is single party ruled China that has been more successful at bringing more people out of poverty than democratic India? The implications for India are clear; investing in education and health for all its citizens is the best solution for long term growth.

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