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Africa

No school fees, but what about efficiency?

The President of Burundi, Pierre Nkurunziza, has taken the brave step of dropping fees for primary school, thereby making access to primary education easier for many children in the country. But what about the education sector's ability to cope with a sudden increase in demand for education? Are there enough teachers? Is there enough money? And, as the student to teacher ratio will inevitably increase, what happens to the quality of education these children will receive?

The future of money transfers

Kenyan blogger Bankelele writes about the cash remittance business in Kenya:

Past: Surprisingly, Western Union and Moneygram, which have been recording growing volumes and signing up new banks (like KCB) every month, already represent the past in money remittance. The reason for this is the cost of the transfer... about 15% of amount transferred...

The wisdom of Google

Saw the New Yorker's James Surowiecki yesterday, speaking about his book, The Wisdom of Crowds. He praised the effectiveness of 'prediction markets'. For example, Hewlett Packard (internally) sold assets that paid off depending on how big next quarter's printer sales turned out to be.

African economies can overtake Switzerland

When battling with jet-lag most people take sleeping pills, watch TV, or toss and turn in bed. Economists, however, put their sleepless nights to better use. The IFC’s Chief Economist, Michael Klein, tinkered with the Doing Business database in the middle of a sleepless night in Johannesburg and created a hypothetical African country which adopted the best African practice on each of the Doing Business indicators.

Private health insurance in Africa

The New York Times offers us 'Neglected poor in Africa make their own safety nets':

Plans in which neighbors come together and create their own makeshift health coverage are the rage in Africa, particularly in the continent's west. Here, the plans now have a significant presence in 11 countries and membership has grown beyond 200,000 people.

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