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South Asia

Bringing Finance to Pakistan's Poor

Yesterday I attended the World Bank's book launch of Bringing Finance to Pakistan's Poor: Access to Finance for Small Enterprises and the Underserved. The authors, Tatiana Nenova and Ceclie Thioro Niang, interviewed 10,000 households from across Pakistan's geographic and socio-economic landscape, including both men and women.

Good News in Migration

A few months ago, I attended the World Bank's conference on Diaspora for Development, hosted by Dilip Ratha, lead economist at the World Bank. The general feeling at that time was that remittance flows would contract significantly this year, but, paradoxically, would become a more important source of external financing in many countries, as foreign direct investment had dropped by up to 50 percent.

What triggers reforms?

Mohammad Amin's picture

A previous post by Pablo on the political cost of market reforms suggests that the incentive to reform depends on the impact of such reforms on the re-election chances of the incumbent government, and how much the president or party in power cares about re-election relative to other (enlightened) objectives.

China's revolution in access to finance

Ryan Hahn's picture

China looks set to see a boom in access to finance since the passage in 2007 of the Property Rights Law. Last week, the Financial Times reported on the newfound ability of farmers to monetise their land. Some farmers are selling to larger, more efficient companies, while others are taking advantage of the opportunity to use their land as collateral: