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financial crisis

Men with visions should go see a doctor

Or at least, that’s what a former boss of mine used to say. Undeterred by his wise advice, I was totally won over when Bryan Sivak, DC’s Chief Technology Officer, came to the World Bank a couple of months ago to present his vision of a Civic Commons, under the tagline of “sharing technologies for the public good”. Here is how Civic Commons’ recently launched website summarises the objectives of the initiative:

The G20 tries to get hip

Ryan Hahn's picture

Usually, the term 'G20' induces images of interminable meetings and high-minded but vaguely worded communiques. But the G20 is trying to get hip. It is sponsoring a competition to crowdsource ideas for one of the perennial problems of development (and one greatly exacerbated by the financial crisis) -- access to finance by SMEs. Here are the details:

Re-reading Keynes

Editor's Note: Nadia Piffaretti is assistant and advisor to the Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, Development Economics.

“The world has been slow to realize that we are living in the shadow of one of the greatest economic catastrophes of modern history”. This could be the opening to any one of the dozens of Op-Eds appearing since the start of the crisis, but they are the words of J. M. Keynes from his 1930 piece The Great Slump of 1930.

A road network for private firms

Ryan Hahn's picture

F. Halsey Rogers, a World Bank economist in the Development Research Group, has put together a helpful summary of the impact of the crisis on development thinking. Clearly, financial markets in rich countries went haywire. What should this mean for the role of markets in developing countries?

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