Syndicate content

May 2018

Initial findings from the implementation of the 'Practical Guide for Measuring Retail Payment Costs'

Holti Banka's picture

MoMo Tap in Côte d'Ivoire
In November 2016, we published the “Practical Guide for Measuring Retail Payment Costs”, an innovative methodology that can be customized to country needs and circumstances, without losing the international comparative dimension.

The guide enables countries to measure the costs associated with retail payment instruments, based on survey data, for the payment end users, payment service/infrastructure providers, and the total economy. The guide also enables countries to derive projected savings in shifting from the more costly to the less costly payment instruments.
 

A new Toyota-sponsored startup shakes up Bamako’s public transit

Alexandre Laure's picture
Also available in: Français

Left to Right: Thomas Gajan, Chief Innovation Officer at CFAO, Sendy CEO Meshack Alloys, Teliman CTO Abdoulaye Maiga, and Teliman CEO Etienne Audeoud


Like many African cities, Bamako’s population of 2.3 million is growing rapidly by roughly 5% a year. As people increasingly flock to the city, its road network is coming under increased pressure, especially when it comes to public transportation.

Traditional taxis are too expensive for the average commuter and the alternative option, SOTRAMA or public vans, are uncomfortable and slow, overflowing with people on Bamako’s roads.

Three years in a row: Mauritania continues to excel in its Doing Business performance

Alexandre Laure's picture
Also available in: Françaisالعربية

Fish market and vegetable market, Nouakchott. The daily catch is brought here by the fishermen’s wives and family members to sell the fish.
Photo: Arne Hoel
Description: Fish market and vegetable market, Nouakchott. The daily catch is brought here by the fishermen’s wives and family members to sell the fish.

As the World Bank Group’s flagship publication, Doing Business, celebrates its 15th edition, Mauritania continues to thrive as a major reformer in investment climate policy. The country was highlighted in the Doing Business 2016 report among the top 10 reformers worldwide and the current 2018 report shows that Mauritania outperforms the regional average. 

Following a downward trend between 2010 and 2014, Mauritania has been steadily improving its ease of doing business performance. Figure 1 shows how, in just three year, a series of reforms that began in earnest during 2015, were key to help the country jump a remarkable 26 places from 176th in 2015 to 150th this year in 2018.