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communication

Weekly Wire: the Global Forum

Kalliope Kokolis's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Berkman Center for Internet and Society
Harnessing technology for social good

"Last month the Ford Foundation hosted the Wired for Change conference ("Inspiring Technology for Social Good"), and a pack of Berkman Center folks, friends, and family were in New York for the event. Ford has posted full videos of all of the sessions, and more, on the Ford Foundation website and Vimeo and YouTube channels."

USIP: Communication for Peacebuilding Grant Program

Anne-Katrin Arnold's picture

The United States Institute for Peace has initiated a Communication for Peacebuilding (CfP)  priority grant program to support innovative practice and research designed to increase our understanding of how communication flows and technology can best be leveraged to improve the practice of peacebuilding.

The CfP program is based on two premises. First, communication is fundamental to peacebuilding. Second, in conflict-affected areas, communication technologies are restructuring  the relationship between international organizations, local peacebuilders, and communities in ways that allow more people to communicate, more rapidly than ever before. This has significant and perhaps transformational implications for how peacebuilding programs are implemented.

The call for proposals can be accessed here. The CfP program does not have a geographic focus, and projects in all countries and regions are eligible.

Development 2.0: Three Things We Could be Doing Better

Tanya Gupta's picture

Recently I blogged about how development institutions are not making effective use of social media for development.  But what can be done about it?  In this blog I suggest three specific actions that development institutions can take to proactively include social media in their projects, and discuss some sectors where Web 2.0 could make a real difference. For the sake of simplicity, I will use the terms interchangeably, however for inquiring minds, Web 2.0 and social media have slightly different meanings.

Weekly Wire: the Global Forum

Kalliope Kokolis's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

Poverty Matters Blog (Guardian)
Technology’s role in fighting poverty is still ripe for discussion

"I'm rarely one for predictions, so I shied away from the usual scramble to make a few at the start of the year. Looking back on events, however, is another thing, and for me 2010 has been a particularly interesting year on a number of fronts.

If I were to make one key observation, I'd say that the "D" in ICT4D (Information and Communication Technologies for Development) resembled more "debate" than "development" during 2010. The ICT4D field has always been ripe for fierce discussion – perhaps a sign that all is not well, or that the discipline continues to mature, or that the rampant advance of technology continues to catch practitioners and academics off-guard. Where, for example, does the advance of the iPad fit into ICT4D, if at all?"

Why Sound Technical Solutions Are Not Enough: Part II

Let us go back to the main theme of this blog: why sound technical solutions devised by top ranking technical experts and supported by plenty of resources from the richest countries have failed to deliver the expected results. A review of past experiences identified a number of causes for the failures of past approaches, but most of them appear to be traceable to one directly linked to communication/dialogue, or the lack of; i.e. the limited involvement of the so-called ‘beneficiaries’ in the decisions and the design of activities that concerned their lives. To sum up, lack of results in development initiatives due to people failing to adopt the prescribed behaviours were largely due to the neglect of the voices of those who were expected to adopt and live with such innovations and technical solutions.

Why Sound Technical Solutions Are Not Enough: Part I

Recently I was invited to hold the XI Raushni Deshpande Oration at the Lady Irwin College in New Delhi, India. This blog is a summary and a reflection of that presentation. As it can be inferred from the title, the focus is on why so many development initiatives have failed in the past and many are still failing in the present. Why after all these years, after all the money poured in, all the construction being made and all the resources dedicated to address this issue, are latrines still not being used in many places? Or they are used but not for the intended purpose? And why are bed nets aimed at preventing malaria adopted even when they are easily available? And many more ‘why’s’ such as these could be added to the list.

Reinvigorating the Fight against Corruption

The 9th of December the UN celebrates the anti-corruption day. It is clear that this is a global issue and a cross-cutting one. It concerns virtually all countries, even if in different degrees, and it can be found in all sectors of the development arena; e.g. health, rural development, agriculture, sanitation and many more. Corruption is not an issue that concerns only the rich; on the contrary, the poor are those who suffer the most from corrupt practices, in a number of ways. First of all, corruption subtracts money from the tax revenues which are the main source of social programmes and services. Secondly, the money the rich pay to corrupt officials are usually passed back as increased costs to consumers, and the poorest ones are the ones that will pay the higher price. Finally, corruption affects not only multimillion deals but spread throughout the social realm like a cancer and I know of bribes asked (and paid) to obtain jobs with a salary of forty dollars a month.

Arts and Minds

Caroline Jaine's picture

My last blog entry back in July was perhaps a sign of things to come.  In it I wrote how the “hearts” bit of so-called “hearts and minds” initiatives was often missing.  I argued that the policy makers viewed arts and culture as a fluffy luxury and often missed their power as a key driver for change.  I was at the time a self-critical policy-maker.
 
So, after 15 years as a diplomat and communications strategist, I have given it all up and embarked on Masters of Fine Arts study in Cambridge, England.  At first it felt indeed like a fluffy luxury, at best a mid-life crisis, but once I entered into what I can only describe as a sublime learning curve, I quickly understood that my art making can easily and effectively incorporate my passions for positive societal discourse, transforming conflict and even diplomacy.  Furthermore my art practice can incorporate a genuinely moving participatory element.

Introducing 'Governance for Development' and The Governance and Anti-Corruption Portal

Sina Odugbemi's picture

Although the World Bank Group adopted the Governance and Anti-corruption (GAC)  Strategy in March 2007, it has not done as much as it could have to let relevant global publics know what it is doing on governance, what it is learning and what it is achieving. Thankfully, all that is now about to change.

First, beginning this week is a new blog: Governance for Development. According to Brian Levy, editor of the new blog, the goal is 'to provide a forum among World Bank Group staff engaged in the GAC-mainstreaming endeavor and the wider development community for sharing, reflection and discussion as to the implications of GAC mainstreaming for development work'. The new blog is a collective effort, and it promises to be a fascinating forum for, hopefully, robust exchanges and sharing in the months and years ahead. I will be contributing to the new blog from time to time. Do check it out.

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