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Development Innovation

How to achieve social transformation through innovation with Marcelo Cabrol

Enrique Rubio's picture

Marcelo Cabrol is close to turn 50, and has more curiosity than ever for ideas that can transform the world. I interviewed Marcelo about how to achieve transformation in order to solve the many compelling social issues that our world faces. He says that there are two fundamental elements: understanding the problems we are trying to solve and listening.

Marcelo tells the story about how the conversation about development has dramatically shifted over the past ten years. There are more participants involved in dialogue around poverty now, and that’s a huge opportunity to enrich the conversation. It is also why “everyone interested in development must become a student of the problems”, as Marcelo says, which means understanding the underlying causes of those problems. There’s no substitute for this when entrepreneurs are getting ready to sell their ideas for development.

Then, the ability to listen, together with an open mind, is essential to find a solution for the many ideas that are sprouting everywhere.

Marcelo uses one of his dearest fields, education, to explain how this powerful combination can transform an entire sector and adapt it to the new demands and needs of the 21st century.

Listen here:

How to Achieve Social Transformation Through Innovation with Marcelo Cabrol

What Can We Learn from Google's "Mistake?"

Tanya Gupta's picture

Google’s every action is studied under a microscope.  However, one major “mistake” that Google made may have gotten lost.  Google’s policy of freeing up 20% time for all engineers, no management approval needed, was cancelled.  Yes, this is the same policy that was responsible for Gmail.  Google’s former policy had been held up as best practice at Google and in the tech community, and was advertised as a Googler perk.  Although the 20% rule had been used at 3M and HP before, Google made it their own and resulted in industry changing products. 

You may ask - why was the 20% rule such a good idea and why is removing it a mistake? The reason Google’s 20% time off is a great idea is because it worked and worked well. One needs a certain amount of freedom to be creative.  A study on mechanisms of grant funding (long term vs. short term) found that freedom encourages creativity when the freedom was believed to be long term.  “If you want people to branch out in new directions, then it’s important to provide for their long-term horizons, to give them time to experiment and potentially fail.  The researcher has to believe that short-term failure will not be punished” ” says Pierre Azoulay, an associate professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an author of an MIT study on the subject. Freedom of thought inspires creativity and the development community, more than anyone else needs to break away from traditional thinking.