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Media (R)evolutions: Digital Revenue Drives Magazine Publishing

Roxanne Bauer's picture
New developments and curiosities from a changing global media landscape: People, Spaces, Deliberation brings trends and events to your attention that illustrate that tomorrow's media environment will look very different from today's and will have little resemblance to yesterday's.

Much has been said about the decline of print newspapers, but the fate of the magazine industry is less well-known. In a reversal of recent downward trends, total magazine revenue is expected to increase from $97.1 billion in 2013 to $98.1 billion in 2018, according to PwC’s Global Entertainment and Media Outlook, 2014-2018. Similar to the newspaper industry, the Internet is also affecting magazines, with digital advertising revenues accounting for much of the increases in earnings. 

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Nothing New Under the Sun? Social Media, the Arab Spring, and the Reformation Era

Uwimana Basaninyenzi's picture

A few weeks ago, the Economist provided an interesting take on social media, the Arab Spring, and the Reformation era. The article, How Luther Went Viral, claims that centuries before Facebook and the Arab Spring, social media helped bring about the Reformation era.  Led by Martin Luther, the Reformation was a period of religious revolt that led to the division of Western Christianity and the start of Protestantism. The developments of this period were propelled by the advent of the printing press, which the article describes in rich detail. But it begins by making an interesting claim about how Luther and his allies promoted the message of religious reform with the social media of their day—pamphlets, ballads and woodcuts. So basically, the central argument of the piece states that what happened in the Arab Spring is what happened in the Reformation era: a new form of media provided the opponents of an authoritarian regime an opportunity to voice their concerns, affirm their discontent, and mobilize their actions.