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Weekly Wire: the Global Forum

Kalliope Kokolis's picture

These are some of the views and reports relevant to our readers that caught our attention this week.

ijnet
How InfoAmazonia is taking data storytelling to the next level

“Last year, InfoAmazonia launched a new website that began tracking environmental threats to the Amazon region, such as deforestation and wildfires, and displaying them in maps. Now, we're taking it to the next level by using interactive photo galleries and video mashups as a unique storytelling tool.

In addition, we are adding functionality to the site with the “distribution widget,” which will allow journalists and NGOs to customize their own maps and data layers.”  READ MORE

Global Witness
EU agrees landmark anti-corruption law for global resource companies

“The EU has today agreed ground-breaking new rules forcing oil, gas, mining and logging companies to publish details of the payments they make to governments for access to natural resources around the world. By providing millions of citizens in resource-rich countries with detailed information about the money generated by their natural resource sectors, the directive represents a watershed moment in the fight against corruption, and is a major victory for Publish What You Pay and Global Witness after 15 years of fighting for these measures.”  READ MORE

The Hunger Project
Local First

“Local First is a development approach that looks first for the capacity within countries before bringing in external expertise and resources, recognises that much of this capacity is found outside central government, and understands that local people need to lead their own development.”  READ MORE

NDItech
Academic Perspectives on #Tech4Dem

“Last week thousands of international studies scholars from around the world converged on San Francisco’s Hilton Union Square for the International Studies Association (ISA) annual convention to discuss issues ranging from national security and feminism to democracy and development. The week-long event featured dozens of panels on tech for democracy and development. Although I was only able to attend a few of the many panels on Tech and Democracy and Development, the ones I did attend were engaging.

One panel, “Theorizing Media Governance and Regulation in the Global Information Society,” highlighted trends in the development of legal and regulatory practices across countries and over time. This panel highlighed many of the issues currently being faced by democracy development organizations and activists on the ground. Three of the papers on the panel examined the spread of ICT rules and regulations across national borders. The process of legal and policy creep across borders can significantly affect Internet freedom and access in whole regions and impact the effectiveness of organizations to engage in development activities.”  READ MORE

Mashable
Melinda Gates: Tech’s Responsibility to the Developing World

“Melinda Gates is no stranger to technology. After working at Microsoft in various roles for nine years, she understands tech, specifically, how it can help people overcome obstacles, disrupt the status quo and make room for global progress.

Gates is also a social good pioneer. Philanthropist, businesswoman and co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, she has spearheaded efforts to improve health and development around the world." READ MORE

Poverty Matters
Politics makes people prevaricate, even when famine looms

“It is a familiar paradox: the world sees famine coming, yet acts only after the event. The food crisis that engulfed the Horn of Africa in 2011 was predicted almost a year before it happened. Famine was likewise foretold in the Sahel region, which last year experienced extreme hunger for the third time since 2004. Early warning systems are the Cassandras of the modern world, accurate yet unheeded augurs of tragedy.

Donors and NGOs know this, but what fewer seem to know is how to change things – and why they aren't already changing.”  READ MORE
 

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Photo credit: Flickr user fdecomite


 

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