According to the World Bank’s What a Waste 2.0 report, waste generation is expected to grow by 70% by 2050, while our global population is expected to grow at less than half of that rate.

Sameh Wahba, Silpa Kaza, Kremena M. Ionkova |

At the G20 Leaders Summit in Japan, World Bank Group President David Malpass stressed reducing inequality and realizing inclusive growth globally.

David Malpass |

Financing UHC efficiently and equitably is important to ensure inclusive growth—especially since the health sector accounts for 11 percent of global GDP.

Kristalina Georgieva |

City leaders will gather again at the Urban 20 Mayors Summit in Tokyo, Japan, to continue their conversations and further unlock cities’ tremendous potential in driving inclusive, resilient, and…

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez, Horacio Cristian Terraza |

In the summer of 1742, two typhoons swept across Japan in quick succession, bringing torrents of heavy rain and flooding major rivers. Records from a young monk who witnessed the floods describe a…

Jolanta Kryspin-Watson, Jia Wen Hoe |

Data source: Statistics Bureau of Japan In 1966, Japan experienced a sudden drop in its fertility rate—for just that year. During the 1960s, the fertility rate was about 2.0 to 2.1 children per…

Emi Suzuki, Haruna Kashiwase |

By 2050, waste generation is projected to increase by 70 percent and drastically outpace population growth by more than double. Managing all that waste is becoming an important agenda for many…

Sameh Wahba, Frank Van Woerden, Kremena M. Ionkova |

Economic inclusion programs provide a “big push” to help the extreme poor and other vulnerable people move into sustainable livelihoods, and can play an important part in poverty reduction. Photo…

Ines Arevalo, Michelle Kaffenberger, Aude de Montesquiou |

© Dominic Chavez/Global Financing Facility [[tweetable]]Still today, in almost all societies around the world, women are less well-off than men.[[/tweetable]] Women are still paid less than men;…

Kristalina Georgieva |

This page in: 日本語 When it comes to their heritage buildings, both Bhutan and Japan have one common enemy: Fire. A view of Wangduephodrang Dzong in Bhutan which was destroyed by fire in 2012.…

Barbara Minguez Garcia, James P. Newman, Dechen Tshering |