Even in the most challenging places, investment and growth are possible. And of all the places most in need of development, the Sahel must sit near the top of the list.

Aliou Maiga |

Houses under construction. © John Hogg/World Bank [[tweetable]]Affordable housing is a major challenge across West Africa, where fewer than 7 percent of households can afford to buy their own home…

Martin Spicer |

Also available in: Français Brainstorming session at the Bamako Policy Hackathon. Photo: World Bank What would happen if you put all the relevant players for the entrepreneurial ecosystem —…

Alexandre Laure, Jon Stever |

New Zealand has a long history of supporting its close neighbors in the Pacific, both in times of disaster and emergencies, and to help improve the lives of many thousands across the region. On…

Kara Mouyis |

Coastal erosion is threatening homes and livelihoods in Togo. Photo by: Eric Kaglan, World Bank  Togolese families often place talismans, thought to contain magical or spiritual properties,…

Dahlia Lotayef |

Most of us are familiar with Benjamin Franklin’s observation that “In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”  For many of us, we could also add physical disability…

Chris Bennett |

For the first time in history, the number of people living in extreme poverty has fallen below 10%. The world has never been as ambitious about development as it is today. After adopting the…

Sri Mulyani Indrawati |

Understanding macroeconomic volatility part 3Read parts 1 & 2
There’s good evidence that a country’s level of financial development affects the impact of volatility on economic growth,…

Francisco G. Carneiro, Ha Minh Nguyen, Rei Odawara |

Understanding Macroeconomic Volatility: Part 2 The fact is that a government can soften a recession by increasing spending (the counter-cyclical approach) to raise demand and output. If government…

Francisco G. Carneiro, Ha Minh Nguyen, Rei Odawara |

Volatility in financial markets gets wide attention in the public eye. Less noticed is what we in the development world call macroeconomic volatility—faster-than-desired swings in the broad forces…

Francisco G. Carneiro, Ha Minh Nguyen, Rei Odawara |