Cities are critical engines of global growth. But as cities grow, they’re increasingly vulnerable to climate change and natural disasters.

Sameh Wahba, Horacio Cristian Terraza |

Also available in: Russian The “miracle pine, ” a 250-year-old tree that survived the 2011 tsunami in Japan, has been preserved as a memorial to the 19, 000 victims of the disaster. (Photo via…

Ko Takeuchi |

Since October 29, 2015, Central Asia experienced fifteen earthquakes of moment magnitude 5.0 or greater, which on average amounts to an earthquake every 6 days.  Among these events are two notable…

Joaquin Toro, Maryia Markhvida |

Imagine yourself in the last century, walking down one of the streets of a large Central Asian city. You are surrounded by architecture dominated by the Soviet style, with common building types…

Joaquin Toro |

También disponible en español The earthquake in Costa Rica caused serious damage, including to major national utilities such as the water network. More than 1.3 million people in San Jose depend…

Fernando Ramírez |

También disponible en español  No two earthquakes in the world cause equal damage, according to scientists. This is particularly true in Latin America, a land of contrasts. Whereas in 2010, an…

Niels Holm-en |