It is hard to believe that only 70 years ago, in most Latin American countries, women could not vote. Or even more recently, women’s access to land under agrarian reforms depended on factors .…

Reina Zavala, Ivonne Astrid Moreno Horta |

With climate change, extreme events are expected to be the “new normal” for many small island developing states. It will take coordination and action from multiple stakeholders to effectively…

Joaquin Toro, Kerri Cox |

Evidence from population-based surveys in Latin America and the Caribbean shows that children living in homes in which women experience intimate partner violence are more likely to experience…

Diana J. Arango, Eliana Rubiano-Matulevich |

This blog post is part of a series for the 'Bureaucracy Lab', a World Bank initiative to better understand the world's public officials and explores a range of approaches to…

Daniel Rogger |

In the past decade, the GCC countries have made a number of steps towards improving women’s access to education, health care, and employment, as well as encouraging women to participate in…

Issam Abousleiman |

In Guatemala and Honduras, education is legally compulsory through ninth grade, but nearly 40% of sixth graders drop out before getting there. This is the reality for many countries middle and low…

Melissa Adelman, Francisco Haimovich Paz, Enrique Alasino |

Central America has great development opportunities that aim at strengthening resilience by managing its current risks

Haris Sanahuja |

With support from the World Bank’s READ Trust Fund Program, representatives of all ministries of Education of Central America, regional and international specialists and civil society…

Rita Almeida, Seynabou Sakho |

The rise of blockchain promises to revolutionize many sectors, including cross-border trade logistics and global supply chains: blockchain can help track international shipments more effectively,…

Chi Fung Fan, Almud Weitz, Yin Lam |

Hundreds of thousands of tons of plastic remain uncollected on Caribbean islands each year and voluminous waves of plastic waste wash up on the shores, especially after severe storms.

Karin Erika Kemper, Tahseen Sayed |