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A year of building sustainable communities in 12 stories

Andy Shuai Liu's picture
What are some of the key issues that will shape global development in 2017?

​From addressing the forced displacement crisis to helping indigenous communities, and from implementing the “New Urban Agenda” to enhancing resilience to disasters and climate change, one thing is clear: we must step up efforts to build and grow economies and communities that are inclusive, resilient, and sustainable for all—especially for the poor and vulnerable.
 
In the timeline below, revisit some of the stories on sustainable development that resonated the most with you last year, and leave a comment to let us know what you wish to see more of in our “Sustainable Communities” blog series in 2017.

Ahead of the next Habitat conference, the urban world we want

Sameh Wahba's picture


There is no better way to mark this year’s World Cities Day than reflecting on the adoption of the New Urban Agenda at the recent Habitat III conference in Quito. The agenda reaffirms the political commitment to sustainable urbanization and provides a framework to guide global urban development over the next 20 years, based on a shared vision of cities that are inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

In an era of rapid urbanization and climate change, managing urban growth sustainably and building cities that work is indeed one of our most pressing development challenges.

Already, more than half of the global population — nearly 4 billion people — live in urban areas. Two decades from now, that number will grow to 5.5 billion — more than 60 percent of the world’s population. At the same time, the total built-up area of the world’s cities is expected to be double by 2030 what it is today, if not more.

Because urban-planning decisions lock cities in for generations, what policymakers decide in these two decades will make or break cities’ sustainable future for the rest of this century. With that in mind, one may ask: What will the world look like when Habitat IV takes place in 20 years?

I can imagine two opposite ends of the spectrum.

Implementing the New Urban Agenda needs financially strong cities

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Cities around the world face increasingly complex challenges such as rapid urbanization and climate change. Meanwhile, many cities facing the most pressing problems lack sufficient funding to meet local needs. This is especially the case for developing countries, where cities require significant infrastructure investment to provide basic services to growing populations and expanding urban areas.
 
How can cities access, leverage, and manage the fiscal and financial resources required to implement the New Urban Agenda and meet the growing needs of local populations?
 
To explore this issue, World Bank Senior Director Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez discussed the UN Habitat III policy paper on municipal finance and local fiscal systems with Mac McCarthy, President and CEO of the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.
 

Investing in resilient cities can help the urban poor

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
By 2030, without efforts to boost urban resilience, climate change may push up to 77 million urban residents into poverty.
 
The good news is that the world has a brief window of opportunity to make cities more resilient to climate change, natural disasters, and other stresses, as almost 60% of the urban area that will be built by 2030 is yet to be developed.

Por qué las ciudades importan para el sistema global de alimentación

Francisco Obreque's picture
Also available in: English
La Paz, Bolivia. Photo by Andy Shuai Liu / World Bank

La semana pasada fui parte de la delegación del Banco Mundial en la Conferencia Habitat III en Quito, reflexionando sobre el futuro de las ciudades y participando en un panel sobre seguridad alimentaria. Mientras estaba allí, no pude evitar de recordar la historia de Wara, una mujer indígena aymara, una de los 8 hijos de una familia rural pobre del Altiplano boliviano. La pobreza la forzó a migrar a la ciudad cuando era joven.

Viviendo en La Paz, Wara ha estado trabajando por décadas como nanny en hogares. Ella tiene tres hijos ya jóvenes. El mayor tiene sobrepeso y ya ha tenido varios problemas de salud. Él trabaja ocasionalmente con su padre en la construcción de casas. Los otros hijos todavía están en el colegio y Wara espera que con educación ellos podrán conseguir un buen trabajo en el futuro.

De acuerdo a las estadísticas, Wara ya no es pobre. En realidad, Wara y su familia están mejor en comparación con sus modestos orígenes. Sin embargo, la verdad es que ella es vulnerable y puede rápidamente caer de nuevo en la pobreza y el hambre.

Hábitat III: La Nueva Agenda Urbana y el rol de los bancos multilaterales de desarrollo

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Also available in: English
En apoyo de la "Nueva Agenda Urbana" adoptada esta semana durante la conferencia mundial de Hábitat III organizada por la ONU, ocho bancos multilaterales de desarrollo (BMD)- el Banco Asiático de Desarrollo (BAsD), Banco Africano de Desarrollo (BAFD), el Banco de Desarrollo de América Latina (CAF), el Banco Europeo de Reconstrucción y Desarrollo (BERD), el Banco Europeo de Inversiones (BEI), el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID), el Banco Islámico de Desarrollo (BIsD), y el Banco Mundial - están poniendo el contenido de la agenda en práctica mediante la emisión de una "Declaración Conjunta", expresando su compromiso para promover la urbanización y las comunidades urbanas equitativas, sostenibles y productivas.

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez, Director superior de las Prácticas Mundiales de Desarrollo Social, Urbano y Rural, y Resiliencia del Banco Mundial, habla con Juan Pablo Bonilla, Gerente del Sector de Cambio Climático y Desarrollo Sostenible del  BID, sobre cómo las organizaciones trabajarán conjuntamente para financiar la "Nueva Agenda Urbana".
 

Quito: Turning sustainable transport ideas into reality

Mahmoud Mohieldin's picture
During Habitat III in Quito, Ecuador, World Bank Senior Vice President Mahmoud Mohieldin and Arturo Ardila-Gomez, Global Lead for Urban Mobility & Lead Transport Economist, look at an example of how World Bank-supported operations and technical assistance contribute to the objectives of the Sustainable Development Goal No.11 to make cities inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable.
 


The World Bank views Planning, Connecting, and Financing as three essential policy tools to nurture inclusive economic growth in cities. The Connecting tool is aimed at connecting people with jobs and schools, and businesses with markets, in order to help promote inclusion. Within the framework of its transport initiative, Sustainable Mobility for All, the World Bank is assisting client countries and cities in developing urban transport projects and policies that support both public transport and non-motorized transport. 

Competitive cities for jobs, growth, poverty reduction and shared prosperity?

Soraya Goga's picture
Photo by ecuadorpostales via Shutterstock

We are all aware of the statistics: cities are home to more than 50% of the world’s population, and they are growing so fast that 66 out of 100 people on earth will be urban dwellers by 2050. This, of course, will have major implications for people and poverty, climate change, and service delivery.
 
But did you also know that cities are the key drivers of global and national economic growth?
 
Currently, cities generate more than 80% of global GDP. Since the early 2000s, three-quarters of the world’s 750 largest cities have grown faster than their national economies. One of the key reasons for those cities’ success is higher productivity—as a result of their ability to attract skilled workers—as well as a high concentration of productive entrepreneurs and firms.
 
For decades, national and city leaders have also taken actions to build competitive cities, increasingly facilitating firms and industries to create jobs, raise productivity, and increase incomes over time—especially for the urban poor. They see this as the pathway to eliminate extreme poverty and to promote shared prosperity. This is particularly important in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where most of the world’s extreme poor live.

Toward a “New Urban Agenda”: Join the World Bank at Habitat III in Quito

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Cities are home to more than half of the world’s population, consume two-thirds of the world’s energy, and produce 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions. And this trend will only continue: by 2050, 66% of the 10 billion people living on earth will be urban dwellers.
 
As we mark World Habitat Day, these numbers remind us of a serious fact: while rapid urbanization brings tremendous opportunities for growth and prosperity, it has also posed unprecedented challenges to our cities—and the people who live in them.

Chief among these challenges is meeting fast-growing demand for infrastructure and basic services such as affordable housing and well-connected transport systems, as well as jobs—especially for the nearly one billion urban poor who are disproportionately affected by climate change and adverse socioeconomic conditions.

So, what will it take to build inclusive, resilient, productive, and livable cities?

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