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A Tale of Two Competitive Cities: What Patterns Are Emerging So Far?

Megha Mukim's picture
What do the cities of Bucaramanga and Coimbatore have in common and what have they done differently to enable fast-paced private sector development? As noted in a blog post earlier this year, the World Bank Group is pursuing a Competitive Cities Knowledge Base (CCKB) project, looking at how metropolitan economies can create jobs and ensure prosperity for their residents. The first two case studies – Bucaramanga, in Colombia’s Santander Department, and Coimbatore, in India’s State of Tamil Nadu – were carried out between April and June 2014.

What makes a city competitive?

Megha Mukim's picture

What do the cities Bandung, Bucaramanga, Izmir, Kigali, Patna, and Agadir have in common? They are all cities that have outperformed their national economies and are growing jobs. The World Bank's urban development and private sector development departments are jointly working on a new knowledge base on Competitive Cities. The project includes in-depth case studies of economically successful cities across all continents, beginning with the six listed above. What makes these particular cities so interesting? Read the team's blog to find out. Can you help guide our work? What types of insights and guidance would be helpful to making your city more successful?
 

Detroit’s future city framework offers lessons on resilience

Chisako Fukuda's picture

There is a positive vibe around Detroit today, as the city transforms itself under the Detroit Future City Strategic Framework, a blueprint that will guide decision making and actions to realize a shared vision. In many ways, Detroit embodies the problems of cities around the world – post-industrial decline, deterioration of services, lack of economic opportunities. What can we learn from Detroit’s experience to become more resilient? Dan Kinkead, Director of Projects for the Detroit Future City Implementation Office, shares his insights on moving a legacy city into the future.

You’ve emphasized the importance of participatory planning in developing a framework for Detroit’s future. Why?

Top Ten New Urban Jobs

Dan Hoornweg's picture

With about 185,000 people a day moving into cities – some 2 billion more people by 2035 – cities are where the action is and jobs are available. Following is a top ten urban report for tomorrow’s job seekers.

1.   Construction Workers. Someone’s got to build all those new cities with their infrastructure, buildings, transportation systems, waste management, and power supply. And then there’s the retrofitting of existing cities. How are we going to pay for all this construction? Over the next 30 years the world will see an unprecedented increase in wealth as the land being taken over by cities grows in value. Let’s just hope we build ‘sustainable cities’ or the true costs will far outweigh the benefits.

2. Civil Engineers and City Planners.    Used to be you could graduate as a civil engineer and start building roads, buildings, railways, ports and wastewater treatment facilities. The ‘civil’ part just distinguished it from military engineering, the world’s first engineers. Now the ‘civil’ in civil engineering can just as easily refer to civility and civilization. Today, civil engineers, the builders of cities, need to help develop and nurture a social contract that is always stronger than concrete and steel. Also, an encouraging trend in many countries – more than half of the freshmen civil and environmental engineering students are female.