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  • Reply to: Success when we deemed it failure? Revisiting sites and services 20 years later   2 days 4 hours ago
    Supporting displaced communities and those in refugee camps by adopting a sites and services approach?  Thank you for that important suggestion.  Yes, certain elements of the sites and services approach can potentially be modified and used in such situations.
  • Reply to: Success when we deemed it failure? Revisiting sites and services 20 years later   2 days 5 hours ago
    "Balancing urgency with patience" because urban development takes time.  Very well said!  Many thanks for your comments.
  • Reply to: Success when we deemed it failure? Revisiting sites and services 20 years later   2 days 9 hours ago

    Excellent blog--many lessons including for how and when we measure impact. These type of results probably hold true for some other sectors as well. I think this approach of sites and services for new urban development would be highly feasible in many contexts including for places such as Dadaab and also in other places such as Somalia grappling with returns and IDP issues; and in cities which have grown far beyond their original city centers and are facing both services and housing shortages. I'm sharing this blog.

  • Reply to: Success when we deemed it failure? Revisiting sites and services 20 years later   3 days 9 hours ago

    A striking reminder of how orthodox evaluations, which demand rather short-term assessments, can lead to the premature dismissal of promising investments. Planning lacks the luxury of fault-free experimentation in designing urban interventions, and perhaps this is why our evaluations lean toward the conservative notion of short-term measurable results. Thank you for sharing this important story that captures so beautifully why a little more heterodoxy is required in evaluation rationales! It is quite rare yet so critical for development organizations like the Bank to make time for and share real reflections on processes of evaluation. This is a very useful lesson about balancing urgency with patience in urban development.

  • Reply to: Success when we deemed it failure? Revisiting sites and services 20 years later   6 days 11 hours ago
    The twists can go both ways – some initiatives that seem successful early on can fail over time and vice versa.  Either way we learn.  So, we really do need to look at results and impact over time. We are hoping that project teams and researchers in other countries and regions will identify older projects that are worthy of a second look and help us learn more about what has worked over time.  Thank you for your comments!