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Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR)

Investing in modern hydromet services for a climate-resilient Africa

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
 


In Sub-Saharan Africa, if no action is taken, an estimated 40 million people could fall back into poverty by 2030 because of weather and climate shocks.
 
To help reduce these impacts, modernized weather – or “hydromet” – services bring together meteorological and hydrological agencies, disaster risk managers, and end-users across all sectors to deliver actionable, timely, and usable climate and weather information to support decision making.
 
Hydromet and early warning services provide life-saving information that protect people and assets, preserve livelihoods, and promote prosperity in climate and disaster risk prone areas. For example, early warning systems reduce the impacts of floods, droughts, storms and other natural hazards while protecting citizens, assets, and businesses.

الكوارث الطبيعية ليست سوى جزء ضئيل من المخاطر التي تهدد مدن الشرق الأوسط وشمال أفريقيا

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Also available in: English | Français
 

ملحوظة: هذا الفيديو متاح باللغة الإنجليزية فقط

يتزايد الاعتراف بأهمية سياسات المرونة في المناطق الحضرية في العديد من دول العالم باعتبارها سمة رئيسية لنظام حضري فعّال. وغالباً ما تتركز المناقشات الدائرة حول المرونة والقدرة على التكيف مع الكوارث التي تسببها المخاطر الطبيعية. غير أن المدن تتعرض أيضاً بشكل منتظم  لصدمات وضغوط أخرى عديدة غير هذه الكوارث. ولا تختلف المدن

Les catastrophes naturelles sont la partie émergée de l’iceberg au Moyen-Orient et d’Afrique du Nord

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Also available in: English | العربية
 

De plus en plus, la résilience fait partie des attributs jugés essentiels d’un système urbain efficace. Souvent, les discussions autour de cette question tournent autour des catastrophes liées aux risques naturels. Or, les villes subissent d’autres formes de chocs et de stress. Celles de la région du Moyen-Orient et de l’Afrique du Nord (MENA) n’y échappent pas et sont au moins autant, si ce n’est plus, exposées à un vaste ensemble de chocs.

India: How to help communities break the vicious "disaster-poverty" cycle

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
 

Natural disasters push the near poor to below the poverty line & contribute to more persistent and severe poverty, creating poverty traps. Impacts on their livelihood pushes them further down the poverty line and as they own few assets it is very difficult for them to break this cycle.
Poor are caught up in and disaster-poverty vicious circle- are more likely to reside in hazardous locations and in substandard housing exposing them more to disasters. Poor households in disasters use harmful coping strategies, such as reducing expenditures on food, health, & education or increasing incomes by sending children to work.

The gender gap in the disaster risk management sector: why it matters

Caren Grown's picture
 

Over the past decade, the practice of disaster risk management (DRM) has evolved and matured.  From mainly focusing on disaster response, local and international actors alike now emphasize the importance of preparedness and prevention – saving lives and avoiding losses even before disaster strikes.

What if we could use nature to prevent disasters?

Brenden Jongman's picture
 

Heavy rain and severe flooding brought the city of Colombo, Sri Lanka, to its knees. In China’s Yangtze River Basin, rivers spilled their banks, inundating towns and villages. In Mobile Bay, Alabama, strong ocean waves carried away valuable coastline.

In each of these locations, disasters caused by natural hazards seemed beyond human control. But instead of focusing only on building more drains, seawalls and dams, these governments turned to nature for protection from the disasters. Several years later, the urban wetlands, oyster reefs and flood plains they helped establish are now keeping their citizens safe while nourishing the local economies.

Disasters due to natural hazards are just the tip of the iceberg in MENA cities

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
Also available in: Français | العربية
 

Resilience is increasingly recognized as a key attribute of an effective urban system. Discussions on resilience often center around disasters caused by natural hazards. However, cities are increasingly exposed to multiple shocks and stresses beyond disasters. Cities in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) are no different and are equally if not more vulnerable to a large set of shocks.

Building back stronger, faster, and more inclusively

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
 

Disasters caused by natural hazards result in average annual welfare losses of over US$500 billion and push up to 26 million people into poverty each year.  Some of these negative consequences are due to recovery that is not resilient, takes too long and is not equitable.  According to the Building Back Better report, this can be mitigated by building back stronger, faster and more inclusively following a disaster.

The 3 challenges in building urban resilience in Freetown

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
 

Operationalizing the Action Plan on Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture
 

The World Bank Group has launched its Action Plan on Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience.  As an institution that is committed to development, the World Bank has an enormous responsibility to help countries and communities act early, to build resilience to what we know they are going to be facing – more frequent and more dramatic climate disasters because of climate change. 
 
In fact, over the past 30 years, more than 2.5 million people and almost $4 trillion have been lost to disasters caused by natural hazards, with global losses quadrupling from $50 billion a year in the 1980s to $200 billion in the last decade, reaching $330 billion in global losses in 2017.

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