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menstrual hygiene

An institutional view on Menstrual Hygiene Management

Christian Borja-Vega's picture
Recent research points out that adequate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in schools improves school attendance, health and cognitive development of students, nurtures better WASH habits, while addressing gendered dimensions of exclusion. Despite this evidence, operationalizing and streamlining important Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) elements into interventions that upgrade overall school infrastructure is often challenging.

The problem is partially rooted in institutions, who having imperceptibly supplanted traditional & cultural rites of passage often fail to recognize the extent of the need for robust, wholistic and sustained alternatives. Girls experiencing menarche not only require WASH infrastructure, but meaning; they not only need materials, space and privacy to change and dispose of menstrual products, but an environment free from aspersions, taboo and social restriction.
 
Download the full infographic to learn about WASH-based MHM interventions in schools. 

Mainstream Bollywood movie influencing age-old taboos about menstrual health in India

Kanchan Parmar's picture
Over this long Holi weekend, I finally caught up with Padman - the Bollywood movie that tells the inspiring, real life story of Arunachalam Muruganantham – a school drop-out and social entrepreneur from Tamil Nadu who invented a low cost, sanitary pad making machine, and distributed pads to under-privileged women across India.
 
Arunachalam Muruganantham at TED@Bangalore
Arunachalam Muruganantham at [email protected]. Photos courtesy [email protected]

Muruganantham’s lifelong mission to create awareness about unhygienic practices and taboos around menstrual health, especially among rural Indian women, has now been recognised globally.
 
I could never have imagined a macho Hindi film ‘Hero’ testing and trying out sanitary pads to make his wife’s life easier!
 
Menstrual health and hygiene are huge gender and public health issues in India. More than half of India’s women between 15 and 24 years of age lack access to hygienic protection measures during menstruation (National Family Health Survey 2015-16).