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journal publication process

Have Descriptive Development Papers Been Crowded Out by Impact Evaluations?

David McKenzie's picture

During our August break, there was an interesting discussion on twitter after Scott Cunningham tweeted that “Seems like the focus on identification has crowded out descriptive studies, and sometimes forced what would be otherwise a good descriptive study into being a bad causal study. It's actually probably harder to write a good descriptive study these days. Stronger persuasion req.”

Others quickly pointed to the work by Piketty and Saez, and by Raj Chetty and co-authors that have used large administrative datasets in developed countries to document new facts. A few months earlier, Cyrus Samii set up a thread on descriptive quantitative papers in political science.

But the question got me thinking about recent examples of descriptive papers in development – and the question of what it takes for such papers to get published in general interest journals. Here are some examples published over the last ten years, including some very recently:

Writing a Papers and Proceedings Paper

David McKenzie's picture

Ok, this is an even more specialized blogpost than usual, but I thought it might still be of use to some readers. I’ve received several variants of the following question from colleagues “I’m excited that my AEA session was accepted for the papers and proceedings. But how do I write a P&P paper without hurting my chances of also publishing the longer paper?” or “but the paper I have in that session is already forthcoming somewhere else, what should I write as the P&P?”.  I thought I’d offer my advice on this, since there doesn’t seem to be much written out there.

Gender Differences in What Development Economists Study

Seema Jayachandran's picture
Co-authored with Jamie Daubenspeck, a PhD student at Northwestern University

One of the arguments in favor of more gender diversity in the economics profession is that men and women bring distinct perspectives to research and are interested in answering different research questions. We focus in on development economics in this post and examine how the research topics studied by men and women differ.