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Prevention

Campaign Art: The HIV positive poster

Roxanne Bauer's picture

People, Spaces, Deliberation bloggers present exceptional campaign art from all over the world. These examples are meant to inspire.

HIV first emerged in the 1980s, and soon after Brazil's infection rates quickly climbed. A decade later, in the early 1990s, Brazil and South Africa had similar infection rates.  Today, however, the two countries look quite different: South Africa now has one of the highest HIV infection rates in the world, with over 6 million people infected while Brazil has been able to drastically reduce the number of cases to 660,000.

Over the last 25 years, Brazil has initiated a series of steps, including the provision of free condoms and free treatment (due in part to cheap drugs obtained through negotiations with pharmaceutical companies) and was able to reduce the disease’s prevalence. Nevertheless, the number of new HIV cases is  starting to rise again, as international funding for HIV/AIDS programs becomes more limited and as a generation of young people emerges that didn't experience the horror of HIV before widespread treatment was available.

In response, Ogilvy Brazil launched a campaign on behalf of the NGO Life Support Group (Grupo de Incentivo à Vida) that seeks to raise awareness and humanize the disease. They asked HIV-positive individuals to prick their fingers and add a drop of blood to posters that were then placed around São Paulo.
HIV cannot survive for more than an hour outside the human body, rendering the posters completely harmless. The idea is that, just like the posters, people with HIV are not to be feared.
 
VIDEO: The HIV Positive Poster


Broken Windows: Mending the Cracks

Leonard McCarthy's picture

When the World Bank investigates and sanctions a major corporation for corruption related to one of its project, the deterrent impact is readily apparent. However, not every case the World Bank investigates is a major corruption case. In the past year, the World Bank Integrity Vice Presidency (INT) received many complaints related to fraud, and it is important to demonstrate responsiveness to complainants who report credible allegations as well as fix the weaknesses identified. Sanctioning cases of fraud also sends a strong message about abiding by high integrity standards in World Bank-financed projects. 

Left unchecked, fraud erodes development effectiveness. It often coincides with poor project implementation, which can result in collapsing infrastructure or the distribution of counterfeit drugs. It causes costly delays and can lead to direct financial losses for countries which cannot afford it. Fraud also fosters a negative enabling environment, creating opportunities for more serious and systemic misconduct to occur.

Gender-Based Violence: Is it the World Bank’s Business?

Maria Beatriz Orlando's picture

También disponible en Español

Distribution of solar light bulbs/flashlights at the KOFAVIV Women's Center, February 10,
2012.

Gender inequality comes in many shapes and (depressing) colors.  A recent trip to Haiti showed me and my colleagues, perhaps its ugliest and most damaging face: violence against women of all ages, including babies. But as ugly as it is, can we make it our business?

I think the answer is yes. Here is why.