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Haiti

Haïti : de l’impact positif des échanges sur le redressement du pays et son essor économique

Calvin Djiofack Zebaze's picture

A busy Haitian market. Source - Glenda PowersL’horizon semble se dégager pour Haïti, qui poursuit son redressement depuis le séisme dévastateur de 2010. Et cela, grâce (en partie) au commerce extérieur.
 
Les autorités haïtiennes le savent qui s’emploient, avec le Groupe de la Banque mondiale et d'autres donateurs, à identifier les obstacles aux échanges pour les démanteler et doper ainsi les secteurs exportateurs.
 
Au début du mois, une équipe de la Banque mondiale s’est rendue à Port-au-Prince pour une semaine de travail avec les principaux acteurs, publics et privés, de la logistique commerciale du pays, notamment des représentants du ministère du Commerce et de l'Industrie. L’objectif ? Discuter de solutions pour renforcer le programme de facilitation des échanges du pays, financé par un fonds fiduciaire multidonateurs conçu pour aider les pays en développement à renforcer leur potentiel économique et à lutter contre la pauvreté grâce au commerce.
 

How Trade Is Helping Haiti Recover and Grow its Economy

Calvin Djiofack Zebaze's picture

 Sun rising behind clouds in Haiti. Source - Yinan ChenThings are looking up in Haiti as the country continues to rebuild from the devastating 2010 earthquake. And part of this progress is a story of trade.

The Haitian government recognizes this, and is working with the World Bank Group and other donors to identify and remove barriers to trade to better promote export growth.

A World Bank team traveled to Port au Prince earlier this month for a week long workshop with the main stakeholders (public and private) intervening on trade logistic in the country, including the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, in order to discuss ways to strengthen the Haitian Trade Facilitation (TF) program. The program is funded through the Trade Facilitation Facility, a multi-donor trust fund dedicated specifically to helping developing countries realize economic development and poverty reduction through trade.
 

How Much Cement Do I Export? And Other Weighty Questions

Amir Fouad's picture

WITS is how World Bank economists and users like you can answer tough questions on trade.For client countries of the World Bank, there is no shortage of interest in—or desire for—information on trade flows and market access. Improving trade performance is a critical component of many client countries’ development strategies, and trade data hold the key to understanding how countries are faring in the quest to eliminate trade barriers, increase competitiveness, and turn improved market access into actual trade flows.

But the trade data arena is large and complex, full of topical jargon, different nomenclatures and coding systems, availability constraints, and potentially complicated indicators. For newcomers, trade data navigation can be particularly challenging, which belies the immense value and richness in the wealth of information that has become available and accessible over the past few years.

Enter the World Integrated Trade Solution, or WITS.

A Fragile Country Tale: Restrictions, Trade Deficits, and Aid Dependence

Massimiliano Calì's picture

 Masaru Goto, World BankPart of the World Bank’s new vision is to step up its efforts to help fragile and conflict-afflicted states break the vicious cycle of poverty. But this is no easy task.
 
The destruction of productive assets and the restrictions on the capacity to produce are among the most severe economic impacts of conflicts and fragility. These effects explain why countries in conflict or emerging out of conflict typically have very large trade deficits. The productive sector is often particularly weak by international standards, so exports are low and domestic consumption has to rely on imports. Indeed, five of the ten countries with the largest trade deficit in the world (Timor-Leste, Liberia, the Palestinian territories, Kosovo and Haiti) are considered fragile by the World Bank and other regional development banks (figure 1).