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Measuring the environment for e-commerce: A new tool

Michael Ferrantino's picture
In order to promote e-commerce for development, policymakers and analysts increasingly want to know what the conditions are in their countries to support online business activity, and how their countries stack up against others. To this end, the multi-stakeholder eTrade for All initiative, an initiative launched in 2016 at the UNCTAD Ministerial Conference in Nairobi to improve the ability of developing countries and countries with economies in transition to engage in and benefit from e-commerce, has developed a new tool for assessing the e-trade environment at the country level. This tool was developed jointly by UNCTAD and the World Bank Group’s Trade & Competitiveness Global Practice and utilizes data from the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), UNCTAD, the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Universal Postal Union (UPU), World Economic Forum, and the World Bank Group.
 

3 challenges Latin American economies must overcome to boost intraregional trade

Anabel Gonzalez's picture
In the latter part of the 20th century, trade integration helped drive economic growth in advanced and developing countries, lifting millions out of poverty.
 
Since the early 2000s, however, a slowdown in the pace of trade reform, a post-crisis uptick in protectionism, and risk of further reversals are taking a toll on trade, productivity and income growth. In this context, regional integration is increasingly seen as a powerful driver of growth and new opportunities.
 
Regional integration: a worldwide trend
 

The Future is Here: Technology trends currently shaping the world of Logistics

Karuna Ramakrishnan's picture
Also available in: Spanish

Emerging technologies are transforming global logistics. The evidence is everywhere: Logistics companies are exploring autonomous fleets and “lights-out” warehousing, and are looking to Big Data for transport management and predictive analytics. Crowdsourcing start-ups are using a high-tech/asset-light business model. And e-brokerage platforms are providing real-time information from pickup to delivery.
 

Now that the Trade Facilitation Agreement has entered into force...

Anabel Gonzalez's picture

The entry into force of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement on February 22 is a remarkable achievement. The TFA spearheads a global effort to reduce trade costs, helping countries to connect to the global economy. This is particularly relevant for low-income countries who need trade to reduce poverty and nevertheless face costs that are on average three times higher than those of advanced economies.

Searching for New, Better Data to Measure GVCs

Klaus Tilmes's picture
Statistical and international development agencies are working together to try to improve and develop novel ways of measuring countries’ participation in global value chains (GVCs) in the hopes that better data equals better development outcomes.

More and better data capturing the dynamics of GVCs are needed to help governments put in place appropriate policies that support GVC integration and boost employment and productivity in agriculture, manufacturing, and services, while also improving worker well-being, social cohesion, and environmental sustainability.

TCdata360: Filling Gaps in Open Trade and Competitiveness Data

Klaus Tilmes's picture
The World Bank Group just launched a new open data platform for trade and competitiveness – TCdata360. Try it today and share your visuals on Twitter with the hashtag #TCdata360.

Open data – statistics that are accessible to all at little or no cost – is a critical component of global development and the World Bank Group’s twin goals of ending poverty and boosting shared prosperity. How can we measure progress towards our objectives without a method of tracking how far we’ve come?

Much More to Competitiveness than Real Exchange Rates

Gonzalo Varela's picture
Policymakers often associate competitiveness with real exchange rates. Not too long ago, firms in Southern European countries attributed their difficulties to compete in global markets with a strong Euro. Worldwide, a lot has been discussed on the implications of an undervalued yuan on the chances of competing with Chinese firms. Also a few years back, Brazil’s finance minister argued that an ‘international currency war’ had broken out, as governments around the globe competed to lower their exchange rates to boost competitiveness.

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